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RECYCLING FACTS

Find out where you can recycle in your community.
     
 

Recycling Scraps
March 11, 2009

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Recycling & Compost Certification Courses - Register Today

The April 21-23 Compost Certification Course in Ruidoso is filling up fast.  Sign up to learn important topics, including the compost benefits, production, processing, quality measurements and utilization, among other topics.  To reserve your spot today, please register at http://www.recyclenewmexico.com/cert_compost_april_09.htm

 

Recycling Certification Courses

May 12-14, Ruidoso

December 8-10, Albuquerque

 

Composting Certification Courses

April 21-23, Ruidoso

October 20-22, Santa Fe

 

For registration information, please visit www.recyclenewmexico.com/cert_classes.htm

 

 

 

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33% TEAM:Working together
to increase
NM's recycling rate.
Join the 33% Team Today!
WHERE
CAN I RECYCLE?

 

 



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Recycling and Illegal Dumping Grant Applications Due April 3

The 2009 Recycling and Illegal Dumping (RAID) grant applications are now available.  The non-tire RAID applications, which focus on recycling and illegal dumping projects are due April 3, 2009.   Information, instructions, and applications for both tire and non-tire grant programs is a located on the NMED: Solid Waste Bureau website at http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/SWB/GrantandLoanPrograms.htm.

Below are examples of the types of projects that would be considered eligible for funding:

 

Illegal Dumping

  • Eliminate or reduce in amount, degree or intensity illegal dumping sites

  • Research, innovate and/or prevention programs, education, and community clean up days

  • Activities that would help track illegal dumpsites

  • Development or expansion of services of small collection centers that will facilitate the proper disposal of material as an alternative to illegal dumping

  • Development of an action plan to address any of the above

Recycling

  • Activities that will increase access to recycling

  • Research and development for recycling programs, education, infrastructure and other capital equipment for recycling, recycling processing equipment, field trials and/or market development activities

  • Activities that will expand an existing program or services

  • Development of an action plan to address any of the above

As part of NMRC's rural technical support grant from the USDA Rural Utilities Service, NMRC is able to recommend equipment needed to start or expand recycling and assist rural communities (< 10,000 residents) with a grant proposal.  If you'd like this sort of assistance from NMRC, please contact Sarah Pierpont at sarah@recyclenewmexico.com

 

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NMRC Annual Workshop and Rural Recycling Training - June 3

Call for Exhibitors and Sponsors

NMRC would like to invite businesses and organizations to sponsor and/or exhibit at the 2009 Annual Membership Meeting and Rural Recycling Training, scheduled for June 3 at the University of New Mexico Rotunda in Albuquerque. 

 

For more information about sponsor or exhibiting at the workshop, please visit http://www.recyclenewmexico.com/ruralworkshop_reg_09.htm

 

Register Today!

This year's workshop is co-hosted by NMRC and NM Environment Department: Solid Waste Bureau.  The focus is "Rural Recycling - The State of New Mexico."  The event will provide general hot-topic recycling sessions, and will also include focused training for rural communities. Participation is free to communities with populations of 10,000 or less and $30 for NMRC members ($40 for Non-members) from larger communities. 

 

For more information about the workshop and to register as an attendee, please visit http://www.recyclenewmexico.com/ruralworkshop09.htm

 

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Recycling Bills in the 2009 Legislative Session

The NM Recycling Coalition has been following and supporting seven bills that relate to recycling this legislative session. Here is an update of where each of these bills stand. Thanks everyone for your support when we’ve done call-outs for emails and phone calls. It really helps! To see the language of any of these bills, click on the title of the bill or more detailed information on any of these bills please go to the NM Legislative Web Site at http://legis.state.nm.us/lcs/default.asp The session ends March 21 and a lot can happen between now and then.

 

Recycling Development Act HM 548

This bill, sponsored by Representative Jeff Steinborn, uses a solid waste tip fee as a funding mechanism to support a recycling grant program, sends recycling funds directly back to communities, provides recycling technical assistance and marketing assistance, and provides for a statewide public education campaign. The fee is $.60/ton phased in gradually over two years and would generate $2.2 million.

 

Committee Results:

House Business & Industry - Tabled 3/5/09 by a vote of 6 to 5.

House Tax & Rev -

 

County and Municipal Recycling Programs (formerly Beverage Container Recycling Act) SB1

This bill, sponsored by Senator Michael Sanchez, was initially crafted as a bottle bill with a $.10 deposit on most beverage containers. Before the first committee hearing, a substitute bill was submitted in its place. This new substitute bill requires all counties and cities to have recycling in place by December 31, 2009, registering with the environmental improvement board. The bill includes approximately $600,000 in grant monies for recycling. Twenty-five percent of the Litter Control & Beautification Funds (New Mexico Clean & Beautiful, Tourism Department) would be earmarked for recycling and 75% of the Recycling and Illegal Dumping Act funds would go directly to recycling and illegal dumping (leaving 25% for tire recycling projects).

 

Committee Results:

Senate Conservation - 2/3/09 Passed

Senate Judiciary - 3/4/09 Passed

Senate Floor - Passed 3/7/09

House Energy and Natural Resources -

 

State Agency Recycling Annual Reporting SB2

This bill, sponsored by Senator Michael Sanchez, reinforces the requirement that state agencies and the legislature have recycling programs in place, adds materials to be recycled and shifts the reporting requirement to the General Services Division.

 

Committee Results:

Senate Conservation - 2/3/09 Passed

Senate Judiciary - Passed

Senate Floor - Passed 2/18/09

House Health & Government - Passed 3/4/09

House Business & Industry -

House Floor -

 

Study Rubberized Asphalt HM6 - PASSED

This bill, sponsored by Representative Jeff Steinborn, requests the New Mexico Department of Transportation to convene a task force to evaluate the short and long-term costs and savings to use rubberized asphalt on state roads, as well as calculate environmental benefits.

 

Committee Results:

House Transportation - Passed 3/3/09

House Floor - Passed 3/5/09 - Memorial PASSED

 

Green Jobs Bonding Act HB622

This bill, sponsored by Speaker of the House Ben Lujan, creates a fund allocated to creating new green jobs training programs. Recycled-content manufacturing, recycling, composting and construction and demolition re-use projects are identified as green job industries.

 

Committee Results:

House Business and Industry - 2/24/09 Passed

House Tax & Revenue - Passed

House Floor - Scheduled 3/12/09

 

Severance Tax Investment in Green Industries SB420

This bill, sponsored by Senator Eric Griego, allocates a portion of the state severance tax fund to be used to invest in green industry development. Recycled-content manufacturing, recycling, composting and construction and demolition re-use projects are identified as green job industries.

 

Committee Results:

Senate Conservation - 2/24/09 Passed

Senate Finance - Passed

Senate Floor - Passed

House Business & Industry

 

Development Training Funds for Green Jobs SB318

This bill, sponsored by Senator Eric Griego, directs some of the current funding for job training towards the green job sector. Recycled-content manufacturing, recycling, composting and construction and demolition re-use projects are identified as green job industries.

 

Committee Results:

Senate Committees - Passed

Senate Floor - Passed

House Health & Govt -

 

Other Recycling or Solid Waste Bills That We Are Watching

SM60: Maximize Use of Biodegradable Wood Chips more

SB643: Solid Waste Act Permit Fees more

HB824: Solid Waste Act Permit Fees  more

HB636: Car Registration Surcharge & Distribution more

HB281: South Valley Bicycle Recycling Program more

2)   HB 402: Albuquerque Community Bicycle Program more

3)   HB337: Water and Sanitation District Revenue and Info.    more

We are also tracking these bills online at www.recyclenewmexico.com/bills.htm

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Recycling Commodity Prices for March

Mills in the Southwest continue to take downtime or are running below their normal capacity. But opposed to what we were expecting, price for OCC went up $5 to $15 per Ton. This increase is due to a lack of generation, as opposed to a large demand for OCC. The same situation applies to Newspaper which went up $5 per Ton. Sorted Office Paper and other higher grades had little or no decrease in price at all. It is easier to move recyclable plastic now, but prices are still far from what they were last year. Local recycling centers continue to accept most materials, but there is still no payment for mixed paper, low amounts of most plastics, and in some cases Newspaper. 

 

Cardboard…………......................$10-$50/ton

Newspaper……………………….….$5-$35/ton

Sorted Office Paper……..............$30-$70/ton

Mixed paper………………………….No payment, not accepting hard cover books

Shrink wrap………………………….$0.01-$0.035/lb

PET bottles (#1)…………………….. $0.005/lb accepting over 100 lbs of material only

Milk Jugs, natural HDPE (#2)………$0.03-$0.10/lb

Single color HDPE…………………..$0.01-$0.05/lb

Aluminum Cans………………………$0.18-$0.37/lb price changing on a daily basis

Clean Stainless Steel……………….$0.15/lb

 

*Please note that this is a sample of what is being offered in New Mexico for certain commodities. Purchase prices for OCC and Paper are subject to change based on market fluctuations as reflected in the Southwest Region of the Official Board Markets’ Yellow Sheet. Prices vary according to presentation and quantity. These prices are for partial loads. Full truckloads of any of the materials would be paid at a greater price depending on the pick-up location and destination of the material.

 

Other resources:

http://www.wastenews.com/secondaryfiber/

http://www.packaging-online.com/

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A Special Report on Waste: Talking Rubbish                                                                    

February 26, 2009, excerpts from The Economist

 

Environmental worries have transformed the waste industry, says Edward McBride (interviewed here). But governments’ policies remain largely incoherent

Rubbish may be universal, but it is little studied and poorly understood. Nobody knows how much of it the world generates or what it does with it. In many rich countries, and most poor ones, only the patchiest of records are kept. That may be understandable: by definition, waste is something its owner no longer wants or takes much interest in.

Rubbish can cause all sorts of problems. It often stinks, attracts vermin and creates eyesores. More seriously, it can release harmful chemicals into the soil and water when dumped, or into the air when burned. It is the source of almost 4% of the world’s greenhouse gases, mostly in the form of methane from rotting food—and that does not include all the methane generated by animal slurry and other farm waste. And then there are some really nasty forms of industrial waste, such as spent nuclear fuel, for which no universally accepted disposal methods have thus far been developed.

Waste also presents an opportunity in a grander sense: as a potential resource. Much of it is already burned to generate energy. Clever new technologies to turn it into fertiliser or chemicals or fuel are being developed all the time. Visionaries see a future in which things like household rubbish and pig slurry will provide the fuel for cars and homes, doing away with the need for dirty fossil fuels. Others imagine a world without waste, with rubbish being routinely recycled. As Bruce Parker, the head of the National Solid Wastes Management Association (NSWMA), an American industry group, puts it, “Why fish bodies out of the river when you can stop them jumping off the bridge?”

To read the full story, click on the below link:http://www.economist.com/specialreports/displaystory.cfm?story_id=13135349

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Resource Recycling Article - Analysis of Stimulus Package's Effect on the Recycling Industry

A Note and link from Justin Gast, managing editor of Resource Recycling magazine

As everyone is evidently aware of, the recycling industry is enduring many hardships because of the global economic downturn, the most notable being the marketability of the commodities collected everyday in our communities. 

Overcoming the recession will be a monumental task, and the federal government is optimistic that its $787 billion economic stimulus package will provide much of the help needed to get many of this nation's industries back on their feet and thriving again. In fact, the recycling industry is one of those industries directly affected by this sweeping response.

To help make sense of what effects the stimulus bill will have on the recycling industry, the editorial staff of Resource Recycling analyzed the package and developed a guide that will appear in the March issue of Resource Recycling

 An advance copy of the article can be found at the following link:

 http://www.resource-recycling.com/images/e-newsletterimages/Stimulus0309rr.pdf

We want to make sure that our friends in the recycling industry make the most out of this tremendous opportunity, and, as a result, we’re inviting you to pass along this useful information to members of your association, along with a link to a free subscription to Resource Recycling magazine, available here:

 http://www.resource-recycling.com/subscriptions/renewal.html

In addition to new federal investments in recycling, through money allocated for sustainability and green industry grants, billions of federal dollars are expected to be allocated for infrastructure and transportation projects, increasing the demand for certain recycled products. On top of that, as many as 25 projects listed within the U.S. Conference of Mayors' MainStreet Economic Recovery Report involve the expansion or construction of materials recovery facilities, as well as other projects pertinent to the recycling industry.  

If you have any questions about what’s in the bill, what your members need to know about the current recycling market, or just general questions about Resource Recycling, feel free to call our office at (503) 233-1305, and I, or another member of our staff, will be glad to assist you. 

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New Mexico State University Currently Ranking #3 in National RecycleMania Contest!

 

Congratulations to NMSU's Main Campus! They are currently ranked third in the nation in the "Grand Champion" category of RecycleMania. RecycleMania is a friendly competition and benchmarking tool for college and university recycling programs to promote waste reduction activities to their campus communities. Over a 10-week period, schools report recycling and trash data which are then ranked according to who collects the largest amount of recyclables per capita, the largest amount of total recyclables, the least amount of trash per capita, or have the highest recycling rate. With each week’s reports and rankings, participating schools watch how their results fluctuate against other schools and use this to rally their campus communities to reduce and recycle more. 

RecycleMania has passed the halfway point in its ten week course. The competition officially ends March 28 and the winners will be announced April 17th.  here are over 500 colleges and universities participating in the 2009 RecycleMania competition. Both NMSU and Eastern New Mexico are representing our great state.

To view the updated weekly rankings go to the Results page of the RecycleMania website at http://recyclemaniacs.org/results.aspx. From there, click on the blue heading for any of the eight categories to see the full ranking of all schools by division. At the top of these pages you’ll notice several drop down menus, from which you can isolate just the schools within your state.  For further background on the categories, divisions and how they are calculated, consult the Rules section of the website at: http://recyclemaniacs.org/rules.htm.  

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Recycling a Big Hit in Sierra County

As published in the March/April 2009 Rio Grande Sierran. Written by Sandia Gardner.

 

It’s the last Saturday of the month and that means many of Sierra County, New Mexico, residents to the monthly recycling drive. Paper or plastic? We take both, along with glass, junk mail, magazines, cardboard, and aluminum.

 

Since March 2008, several tons of waste have been diverted from both the Sierra County and City of Truth or Consequences landfills. This serves to both extend the life of the local landfills and saves energy that would be used to produce products from raw material. In January 2009 alone, we had over 170 families recycling, filling so many trucks with cardboard, junk mail, and plastic that the City had to return to their facilities to bring in more collection containers.

 

The Bountiful Alliance’s Recycling Project has taken off, and recycling is now a common activity for county residents. Partnering with the Sierra Club, The Bountiful Alliance has recently supported an Educational Poster Contest to promote recycling in Sierra County. Another important partner in this recycling project is the City of Truth or Consequences. The City has provided trucks and workers to help the recycling project safely dispose of collected materials. The final and most important partners in our efforts are the community members.

 

Recycling not only engenders a sense of community involvement and responsibility, additionally it conserves natural resources, such as timber, water, and minerals from domestic and imported sources. It is truly a way to think globally while acting locally.

 

Saturday morning sees more than 20 volunteers arriving with tools to help local recyclers with their delivery. From helping seniors, who might have difficulty removing rings from plastic bottles or lifting heavy loads of paper, to educating the county recyclers in making smart choices, there are a wide variety of efforts made to make each drive a success.

 

Because of the educational efforts, some residents are now getting off of junk mail lists, selecting water

filters as opposed to bottled water, and preparing their items so that they may be able to be recycled.

Education also helps residents understand why some products are not recyclable at this time.

 

There are other sorts of volunteers across the county as well. Some county residents help others

pool their separated items and they bring everyone’s recycling to town. Communities that are a bit farther

from the city of Truth or Consequences, such as Hillsboro and Monticello, have participated in this manner for at least three months. The sense of community and helping the environment is felt as

cars and trucks drive up to drop off.

 

Beginning in February 2009, the City of Truth or Consequences will be making their Recycling

Center available for the drive. With a permit on the way, moving to this new site, located at 601 Nadyne

Ct., Williamsburg, will give a bit more protection to the drive and will begin introducing the community

to a more-permanent facility with extended hours. The drives will continue in the near future, however, in efforts to help community members learn to properly separate the items and make certain they meet the standards for the companies that buy the collected items.

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New Mexico SWANA Roadrunner Chapter Annual Road-E-O

Mark your calendars for the 2009 Road-E-O to be held at the Albuquerque Cerro Color Landfill and the Sandia Motor Sports Park in Albuquerque on Saturday, May 2, 2009 (7:30 am - 4:00 pm). For competition categories and to register for the Road-E-O, go to www.nmswana.com.  For additional information or assistance call JoAnne at 505-872-0164.

  • Each overall winner in the equipment and truck events will receive a stipend to attend the SWANA International Road-E-O event in the fall of 2009.
  • Each overall winner in the equipment and truck events will be awarded a $150 cash bonus
  • In addition the winner of each individual category will be awarded $100 cash bonus.
  • No event will be held unless at least four participants are registered for any one category.
  • Participants entering the 2009 New Mexico Road-E-O that are SWANA members or from member facilities will receive a $15 discount on registration fees.

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Scraps Newsletter Sponsored by Dex

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Call for Papers - Abstracts due March 13 for SWANA's Arid Climate Symposium

The New Mexico Roadrunner Chapter of Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) is hosting an Arid Climate Symposium on August 11-13 at the Marriott Uptown Hotel in Albuquerque.

The Technical Program for the symposium is now being assembled.  SWANA invites you to submit an abstract on one or more of the following (or other) solid waste management topics as they relate to operations in arid and semi-arid climates.

  • Landfill Design & Operations

  • Alternative Landfill Covers

  • Solid Waste Collections

  • Landfill Gas Management

  • Landfill Gas/Waste-to-Energy

  • Safety

  • Solid Waste/Recycling Collections

  • Climate Change/Greenhouse Gases

  • Sustainability

  • Reduction of Carbon Footprint

  • Title V/NSPS

  • Innovative Diversion Strategies

  • Integrated Waste Management

  • Regulatory and Political Challenges

  • Bioreactor Landfills

  • Recycling

  • Case Studies

  • Lessons Learned

  • .......................................and other topics of interest.

To submit a paper for consideration, please send a 150-200 word abstract outlining the major conclusions or messages along with your name, affiliation, address, phone, fax and email address to the contact below.  To recommend a speaker, send the person's name, contact information and suggested topic.  Abstracts and speaker recommendations must be received by Scott Salvas no later than March 13, 2009.

Scott Salvas, Project Engineer, CDM, Inc

6000 Uptown Blvd NE, Suite 200

Albuquerque, NM 87110

Phone: 505-243-3200

Fax: 505-243-2700

Email: salvassj@cdm.com

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Community Recycling Plans Now Available Online

NMRC has created a Community Recycling Plan Template based on a document developed by the NM Recycling and Illegal Dumping (RAID) Alliance.  This template can be used by communities to assess their state of recycling and to help create short and long term recycling goals.  To download the template please visit http://www.recyclenewmexico.com/rural_recycling.htm and scroll down to the link below the Project Objectives header.

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Farmington Curbside Program is Going Strong

Albuquerque Journal, February 19, 2009

 

The company that handles recycling in Farmington says the city's recycling center took in about 221 tons of material last month, nearly double the amount of the year before. Waste Management spokeswoman Marlene Feuer said about a third of Farmington households with trash service participate in curbside recycling — more than the company predicted. Feuer said Waste Management will expand the program to Farmington schools as long as the recycling center can handle the material. She said schools are eager to join.

Jeff Smaka, city public works director, said a contract with Waste Management requires the city to build a new recycling center, estimated to cost about $3 million, in about two years. Feuer said a new center could add enough capacity for businesses to join the recycling program.

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EEM Scrap in Alamogordo Caught Illegally Smelting Materials

Julie Ann Grimm | The New Mexican

 

Clouds of toxic poison are released into the air and water in rural Chinese villages where residents use medieval tactics to disassemble and reclaim metal from electronics. But that's China, and this is the United States. That's not happening here in New Mexico, right? Wrong.

Last year, the state Environment Department investigated a business in Alamogordo and found its proprietor had crudely burned computer circuit boards in a manner that could have posed a health risk to those who live nearby. The business has now cleaned up and moved away, but its existence is a warning for state regulators who seldom hear about such operations.

If it had not been for Elaine Martinez, EEM Scrap might still be using its experimental smelting tactics. When Martinez got a new neighbor, and that neighbor started storing and processing electronic waste, she started to worry. After she was diagnosed with kidney cancer that doctors said was commonly associated with industrial chemicals, she had had enough. She filed complaints with the Environment Department that led to EEM Scrap voluntarily closing its doors.

"I would wake up and feel sick to my stomach and have a bad headache," she said in a recent interview. "It smelled like a bleachy type chemical kind of plastic smell."

Inspectors from the department visited the business, and in correspondence that led to the visit, proprietor James Dinsdale admitted to burning circuit boards in an effort to extract precious metals. In a period of several months, he created about 200 pounds of metal by burning an unknown number of circuit boards. Other stockpiles of materials at the business also posed a threat, investigators said.

He was issued a notice that he had violated state laws by "burning materials without an air quality permit, improper handling and disposal of material, not having an EPA permit," failing to identify hazardous waste in slag materials and other rules. Dinsdale agreed to cease the activities and to clean up his land, but according to correspondence obtained by The New Mexican through a records request, he did so grudgingly. "My neighbor is nutty and has nothing do but worry about me actually working and having a life," he wrote in one e-mail last July. "I'm just fed up with how all of this was handled ... if I had to wait on a permit for everything I did in the process of invention, I would die of old age," he wrote. Efforts to reach Dinsdale were unsuccessful.

Although Martinez lost a kidney after her diagnosis, she has not taken any legal action about the ordeal. The Environment Department also denies there was empirical evidence that the illegal smelting could have led to her illness. "Had he done this for longer than he did ... we'd have had a really bad long-term problem," reads an e-mail from an investigator with the Air Quality Bureau who also theorized that residents nearby may have been exposed to high toxic ambient-air concentrations during periods of burning. Because the department did not take air samples during the burning, however, no air-quality violation notices were issued. James Bearzi, who heads the department's Hazardous Waste Bureau, said the outcome in this case was acceptable.

"This is not the kind of problem that would rise to the level of assessing civil penalties. We got voluntary compliance and determined there was not a threat to human health or to the environment," he said. It's rare that officials receive reports of such operations, he noted, but when they do, investigations are always ordered.

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Recycling Turns Aging Computers, TVs Into Reusable Plastics, Metals

Santa Fe New Mexican by Julie Ann Grimm, February 26, 2009

Getting rid of old computers, out-of-date cell phones or dinosaur television sets is less fun than buying new ones. Should you just dump the old model in the trash? If you drive it somewhere to be recycled, what is your guarantee that it will be dealt with in a way that's safe for the environment? In an era of fast-changing technology — including the impending digital conversion of television broadcasts — discarding electronic waste has become a growing issue.

This weekend in Santa Fe, a one-day, e-waste collection event was aimed at making it easy, safe and certain: keeping the junk out the landfill and making sure reusable materials are returned to the marketplace. An upstart Albuquerque company will work with the city to haul away and recycle as much of the material as they can get their hands on.  Kept whole, the old equipment doesn't have much resale potential, but that changes once it is broken into its raw components.

"Cleaned and separated like we do, all this has a value," said Mullen Estepp as he stood in a warehouse full of old TVs, piles of circuit boards, computers and other electronic items. "So every little component is being recycled. We take all the valuables and use them to pay for the operations."  That's the basic economic model for Albuquerque Recycling Inc., a family business formed this year. The company guarantees "end-of-life" treatment for everything collected. That means the owners promise not to send whole computers overseas or secretly drive materials to landfills.

Gary and Janet Estepp, and their son, Mullen, sell plastic computer and monitor casings to Master Fibers, a large Albuquerque facility where Gary spent part of his career in the plastics business. Master Fibers buys pallets of the material, then squeezes it into compact bales that eventually make their way to plastics manufacturers. When the company amasses enough bales, it sends a truckload of plastic out the door. The last truckload went to Talco Plastics Inc. in Corona, Calif., said plant manager Hector Valverde. That company makes custom plastic compounds.

Other easy-to-retrieve value from e-waste is found in metals. An average television or computer monitor contains between 2.5 and 3.5 pounds of copper, all neatly wound onto an electromagnet in one spot. The electron gun that shoots the picture onto the screen is made of reusable steel. All that makes up for the trouble of dealing with several pounds of leaded glass that make up the rest of the equipment, Mullen Estepp explains. Manufacturers won't pay for it, but some will accept it for reuse if the cost of transportation is covered. In the case of televisions, which typically contain more glass than computer monitors, a $5 fee per set covers the cost.

The company uses a proprietary method of crushing and tumbling the leaded glass. When it collects enough, that will be shipped to an Arizona fiberglass maker. Copper and steel go to local scrap dealers, and other materials collected at the Albuquerque business go to various out-of-state companies. For example, circuit boards go to either a Texas refinery or a California recycler. Another California company accepts computer printers that go through a grinding, a mechanical separation process, according to Gary Estepp.

Collecting and recycling e-waste isn't new for Santa Fe. For years, the joint city/county transfer station off Buckman Road has been the drop-off point for residents. That facility charges a per-pound fee for e-waste but does not recycle TVs. Electronic waste is picked up by shippers on contract with Natural Evolution Inc. Since 2004, the city and county have collected about 320 tons of computers, monitors, telephones and other gadgets that traveled by truck to the Tulsa, Okla., business.

Natural Evolution owner Traci Phillips takes pride in being part of the crowd "doing the right thing." Every year, she deals with more than 3 million pounds of material. The industry is competitive, with brokers trading materials by the pound. It has sometimes involved unscrupulous practices leading to the kind of story exposed last year on 60 Minutes. The CBS News report showed computer circuit boards being incinerated in open barrels in a Chinese village. The investigative report built on information that has been collected for years by a group called Basal Action Network. BAN advocates for a global standard on recycling and disposal of electronic waste to prevent pollution of such rural, poor areas — an idea the United States has yet to buy into.

Phillips said it's important for consumers to know that not every bit of recyclable material that goes to China is treated irresponsibly. Her company only uses downstream vendors that carry an international certification called ISO 140001, which includes tracking and auditing processes intended to demand accountability. "It has been one of our priorities to make sure that none of the material that we handled was being dumped internationally. We have purposely dealt with companies that only hold the highest environmental standards," she said. "We don't deal with brokers that export scrap at all. We don't load containers and we don't ship to port cities. We are very adamant about where and how things go."

That said, her biggest customer right now is Fortune Plastic and Metal, based in Nanjing, China. The company has more than 20 processing facilities throughout the United States, Mexico and Hong Kong, and is a major player in the industry. The economics are based on numbers, Phillips said. "From a global perspective and a market demand, ultimately the demand is in China and India for scrap materials because of the growth that they have," she said. "They have more of their people now wanting cars and TVs and new materials like the U.S. So it's unreasonable to think that all recycled materials are going to stay in the U.S."

Absent plans for reuse, electronics pose a threat to the environment if the items end up in landfills or dumped in the open. A recent report from the U.S. General Accounting Office says e-waste is one of the worst growing waste-management issues. "Without effective phase outs of hazardous chemicals and the development of effective collection reuse and recycling systems," the report reads, "highly toxic chemicals found in electronics will continue to contaminate the soil and groundwater as well as pollute the air, posing a threat to wildlife and people."

ctives header.

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New Member Highlight: Oso Biopharmaceuticals

  

Oso Biopharmaceuticals, LLC is a contract manufacturing company with an emphasis on the production of injectable pharmaceutical products that require special or complex handling.  The company began operations in Albuquerque in 2008 and joined NMRC in January of this year.  Their recycling program began in November of 2008 and they are planning a company-wide kickoff on Earth Day.   

 

Oso Biopharmaceuticals is committed to protecting the environment. As an Albuquerque community member, they conduct business with the highest applicable legal and ethical standards and strive to contribute to the economic development and environmental protection, while seeking to improve the quality of life for their associates, families and communities, and society in general. Oso wants their associates to have a work environment where they feel safe and secure.

 

OsoBio is committed to conducting business in a manner that manages environmental issues responsibly. They fulfill this commitment by:

 

  • Complying with environmental regulations

  • Conducting operations in an environmentally sound manner

  • Applying the principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle in all processes
  • Promoting environmental responsibility among their employees
  • Pursuing continuous improvement in their environmental performance

  • Encourage and educate their associates to take personal accountability for working toward protecting the environment and creating a safe and healthy workplace

For further information about Oso Biopharmaceuticals and their recycling efforts, please contact Josh Montano at josh.montano@osobio.com

Welcome to the Coalition!

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Welcome to New Members 2009

 

Bill Booth, Ditch Witch; John Zarola; Pueblo of Tesuque Environment Department; Nathan Lee and Norman Scott, Navajo Nation; Butch Steinman, Village of Angel Fire; Josh Montano and  Kimberly Foree, OSO Biopharmaceuticals; David Friedman, Friedman Recycling; Rodney Mullens, Mesa Verde Enterprises; Beverly Booth McCauley; Charley Carroll, NM Junior College.

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Grants and Loans

State Loans

NMED Constructions Programs Bureau offers low-interest loans for solid waste projects: http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/cpb/rip.html .

 

Recycling and Illegal Dumping Grant Applications Due April 3

The 2009 Recycling and Illegal Dumping (RAID) grant applications are now available.  The non-tire RAID applications, which focus on recycling and illegal dumping projects are due April 3, 2009.   Information, instructions, and applications for both tire and non-tire grant programs is a located on the SWB website at http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/SWB/GrantandLoanPrograms.htm.

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Regional Round-Up

 

Submit your community's news by emailing english@recyclenewmexico.com . We love to hear about news from around the state!

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Recycling Tidbits

 

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Rise in 2007
Greenhouse gas emissions in the United States increased by 1.4 percent in 2007, according to an annual inventory report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The agency is seeking public comment on the report.

 

Electronics Recycling SuperGuide

PC Magazine has published what it is calling The Electronics Recycling Superguide, on its Web site. It is a tool that shows the consumer how to recycle used electronics through manufacturers, local electronics stores, and online trade-in programs that offer cash or gift cards. The guide lists all OEMs with producer-responsibility programs, where they are offered, what they cost and what they cover.

Check it out at:  www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2341907,00.asp,

Old Printers Welcomed at Retroworks de Mexico

The Mexican subsidiary of Vermont-based American Retroworks Inc. (ARI) is accepting obsolete printers for dismantling and recycling. The company is emphasizing printer recycling at its Retroworks de Mexico facility near Esqueda, Sonora, Mexico. Hand disassembly, parts salvaging, and limited reuse will take place at the plant, which is set up as a women-s co-op. The women who are part of the cooperative will own 50 percent of all profits and control hiring and recruitment at the plant, according to Robin Ingenthron, president of ARI.

 

Ingenthron says printers have been known to present challenges for recyclers. “Used printers and laser printers are the fastest growing component of the electronics waste stream,” he comments. “Shredding leads to ‘fluff’ and ruined plastic [while] cartridge design turnover limits reuse and repair.” He continues, “They are not particularly heavy. They are not particularly valuable. They don't shred very nicely. And they are slow to de-manufacture by hand.” But for a facility looking for material, “they are just what the doctor ordered,” says Ingenthron.

 

ARI is accepting the printers at 5 cents per pound at its facility in Douglas, Ariz., where the material will be prepared for customs preparation for the plant in Mexico. ARI will also offer services as a tolling facility, allowing other United States- based recyclers to own or control the plastic and metal from the operation, with rates negotiated on a case-by-case basis. The facility will follow all U.S. EPA R2 standards, says Ingenthron. He adds that the facility in Mexico is permitted, insured and legal.

 

Report Projects Green Building Market To Increase 6%
A new report projects that the market for green building materials will increase 6% annually through 2013 in the United States. Green building materials generated $58 billion last year and that number is projected to increase to nearly $80 billion, according to the report. The fastest gains will come in the residential market. Information about the report, by Freedonia Group, is available at http://www.reportlinker.com/p0109200/Green-Building-Materials-in-the-US.html .

 

Digital TV Transition Delayed until June 12, 2009
As you may have heard, the Digital TV Transition has been delayed to June 12.  The joint factsheet between FCC and EPA on the transition and TV recycling has been revised to reflect this change.  To download the factsheet, please click here

 

Agromin Named Composter of the Year
The U.S. Composting Council has named Agromin, Ventura, Calif., its Composter of the Year. Agromin recycles green materials from more than 90 communities in Southern California. Last year, the company recycled more than 300,000 tons of green materials. To view the full story, please click here http://wasteage.com/news/Agromin_compost_year_award/

 

New Research Shows that Old Tires Can be Used as Fuel in Cement Kilns

New research shows that using old tires as fuel in cement kilns does not adversely impact the air emissions profile at such facilities, according to the Portland Cement Association. "This study shows that tires, which pound for pound have a greater fuel value than coal, can also help manufacturers recycled tires without adversely affecting emissions," said Tyrone Wilson, director of regulatory affairs at the PCA. The study was conducted by Air Control Techniques and is based on data collected by the PCA from 31 cement plants now using tire-derived fuel.

 

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Calendar

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Recycling and Composting Facility Operator Certification Class Schedule for 2009

 

Recycling Certification Courses

May 12-14, Ruidoso

December 8-10, Albuquerque

 

Composting Certification Courses

April 21-23, Ruidoso

October 20-22, Santa Fe

 

To register, please go to www.recyclenewmexico.com/cert_classes.htm

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If you have questions about any of the above information or have articles for future Recycling Scraps, please e-mail or call me.

English Bird, Executive Director

New Mexico Recycling Coalition

PO Box 24364, Santa Fe, NM 87502

english@recyclenewmexico.com

(505) 983-4470 

   

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