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Recycling Scraps
May 20, 2009

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NMRC Annual Workshop and Rural Recycling Training - June 3

 

The theme for this year's workshop is "Rural Recycling - The State of New Mexico."  The event will present three invited speakers from rural speakers to provide the ins and outs of their successful rural programs, and will also include focused training for rural communities. Participation is free to communities with populations of 10,000 or less and $30 for NMRC members ($40 for Non-members) from larger communities or other entities. This year's workshop is co-hosted by NMRC and NM Environment Department: Solid Waste Bureau. The training starts at 9 AM and ends at 4 PM at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. The day starts with an 8 AM coffee social and will include lunch donated by Whole Foods.

 

Speaker Highlights:

  • Deborah Goss, Santa Ana Pueblo, Resource Recovery Park

  • Adrianne Luetjens, Estancia Valley Solid Waste Authority, Creative Rural Recycling Collection

  • Scott Gibson, Angel Fire Solid Waste Department, Recycling Success in the Mountains

  • Justin Stockdale, NMRC and Resource Revival, will present a training in the afternoon specific to rural recycling collection, marketing and processing.

 
33% TEAM:Working together
to increase
NM's recycling rate.
Join the 33% Team Today!
WHERE
CAN I RECYCLE?

 

 



Exhibitors include NMSU WERC, Natural Evolution, Jackson Compaction, Dex, Trucks West

 

Thank you to our generous sponsors: the U.S.D.A. Rural Utilities Service Program, New Mexico Environment Department, Dex, Herzog Environmental, Jackson Compaction and Whole Foods.

 

Please register by May 27 in order to secure your seat!

 

For more information about the workshop and to register as an attendee, please visit http://www.recyclenewmexico.com/ruralworkshop09.htm

 

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Recycling and Illegal Dumping Awards Announced

 

Letters were sent out last week advising communities about the receipt of the Recycling and Illegal Dumping grant funding. The New Mexico Environment Department: Solid Waste Bureau will be following up to confirm each community's ability to accept the funding and complete the project work. Congratulations to all awardees!

 

Recycling Grant Awardees

 

Name of Applicant Project Title $ Award
Santa Fe County     Eldorado Convenience Center Recycle Area Improvement $3,200.00  
South Central Solid Waste Authority SCRaP Recycling Marketing and Display $3,750.00  
Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Freon Recovery Project $8,500.00  
Village of Eagle Nest     Recycle Trailers $9,000.00  
City of Truth or Consequences   Recycling Facility Expansion $15,500.00  
Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council OETA's Rotating Rolling Recycling Program $20,000.00  
City of Tucumcari     2009/2010 Recycling Project $20,000.00  
Village of Ruidoso     Phase II Expansion of Village of Ruidoso Recycling $20,000.00  
Lincoln County Solid Waste Authority Increase Recycling Material Processing Capacity $20,000.00  
Pueblo of Cochiti     Pueblo De Cochiti Food Waste Recycling Program $20,000.00  
City of Las Cruces     Las Cruces School Waste Reduction and Recycling Demo $10,000.00  
Pueblo of Taos     Taos Pueblo Recycling Initiative $10,500.00  
City of Clovis     "Bring it in ENM" $25,000.00  
Village of Cimarron     Cimarron Recycling 101 $24,000.00  
North Central Solid Waste Authority Increase Residential Recycling in Espanola and Rio Arriba Co $34,000.00  
South Central Solid Waste Authority New Mexico State Parks - Rio Grande Recycling Initiative $35,000.00  
Village of Angel Fire     Cooperative Recycling Program $14,150.00  

 

Illegal Dumping Grant Awardees

 

Name of Applicant Project Title $ Award
Lincoln County Solid Waste Authority Illegal Dumping Surveillance in Lincoln County $3,000.00
Lincoln County Solid Waste Authority Coordinated Clean Up of Lincoln National Forest Illegal Dumping $7,400.00
Dona Ana County La Union Colonia Cleanup Effort $6,000.00
Santa Fe County Santa Fe County/BLM Illegal Dumping Clean Up $7,000.00

 

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E. Gifford Stack Recognized as NM Recycler of the Year 2009

E. Gifford Stack has spent his career as a recycling advocate, first in Washington, DC on the national level and most recently in New Mexico. Gifford is set to retire at the end of May and the award was presented at the NMRC May 7th board meeting instead of the usual Annual Meeting presentation as Gifford will be out of state at that time.

Immediately upon his arrival in New Mexico in 1999, Gifford took a position as director of the NM Environment Department: Solid Waste Bureau Outreach section. He has helped NMED grows its recycling outreach, improved its measurement techniques, has upgraded the certification classes, grown its staff, oversaw the solid waste management plan update and has been a positive contact for the department statewide. He also joined the board of the NMRC, serving in several officer positions including President. In his tenure on the board, he helped oversee the organization's growth in membership, staffing, sponsors, conferences, trainings and legislative outreach.

We'll all miss Gifford and his efforts on behalf of recycling in the state. You can contact Gifford at e.gifford.stack@state.nm.us or 505-827-0129 until the end of the month.

 

E. Gifford Stack was recognized at the May 7 NMRC Board Meeting as NM Recycler of the Year 2009 and for his retirement from the New Mexico Environment Department. From left, Marlon Schaus, Marlene Feuer, Ramon A. Cruz, Justin and Willa Stockdale, Adrianne Luetjens, E. Gifford Stack, Jill Holbert, Jennifer Scacco, English Bird, Vicki Mora, O. Paul Gallegos, Tim Gray, Joel Belding, Randall Kippenbrock, Mike Jago and Margie Marley.

 

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Another Round of Tire Recycling Grants Announced                    

The New Mexico Environment Department’s Solid Waste Bureau (SWB) is pleased to announce that FY 2010 Recycling and Illegal Dumping (RAID) tire grant applications are now available.  The applications are due June 19, 2009!  Applications are being accepted for both tire recycling and illegally dumped tire abatement proposals.  The total amount of funds available for FY 2010 tire grants is $300,000.  

Information, instructions, and applications for the FY 2010 tire grants are available at the SWB website at:  http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/swb/index.htm  (go to Special Announcements on our homepage).

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New Green House Gas Calculator

Environment  Canada  has  created  a  Greenhouse  Gases  (GHG) Calculator  for  Waste  Management  to  assist  municipalities  and other  users  to  estimate  GHG  emission  reductions  from different  waste  management  practices,  including  recycling, composting,  anaerobic  digestion,  combustion,  and  landfilling. This calculator is built into an Excel spreadsheet.

For Info: http://www.hazmatmag.com/issues/ISArticle.asp?aid=1000324605

or go to: http://www.ec.gc.ca/drgd-wrmd/default.asp?lang=En&n=6BFF0449-1

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Three Recycling Bills in Congress

Plastic Bag Reduction Act of 2009

Follow this link to view the bill: House Resolution 2091

Nutshell: Representative Jim Moran (D-Virginia) introduced this bill, which imposes a nickel tax on any single-use carryout bag, covering all retail establishments. The bill, which has no co-sponsors, imposes a nickel tax from January 1, 2010 to 2015, when the tax increases to 25 cents per bag. Reusable bags, bulk or produce bags, prescription drug sacks and multiple-bag packages — garbage, pet and yard waste bags — are excluded from the fee. The bill has been sent to both the House Ways and Means and Natural Resources Committees. The measure calls for the monies collected to go to various programs, with one cent of the nickel going to the retailers implementing the program, one cent to the Land and Water Conservation Fund, another penny available for state and local waste reduction and watershed protection programs, and the last two cents going to pay down the national debt. In introducing the measure, Rep. Moran focused on the environmental impacts of plastic bags, claiming that "ingested marine debris, particularly plastic bags, are killing thousands of birds, turtles, marine mammals, fish, and squid each day." The Progressive Bag Affiliates of the American Chemistry Council came out against the measure, pointing instead to its Full Circle Recycling Initiative as a solution, rather than the tax.

The Electronic Device Recycling Research and Development Act

Follow this link to view the bill: House Resolution 1580 http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?c111:1:./temp/~c111rRhAVG::

Nutshell: The House of Representatives has approved an amended version of House Resolution 1580 already. The measure requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to award multi-year grants to organizations and higher educational institutions to conduct research on innovative and practical approaches to e-scrap reduction and study the environmentally-friendly design, manufacture, refurbishing and recycling of certain electronic devices. Overall funding for the research would amount to $18 million for fiscal year (FY) 2010, and $20 million and $22 million for the subsequent fiscal years. One year after enactment, the National Academy of Sciences would be responsible for submitting to the EPA a report that addressed numerous aspects of electronics recycling, including:  The opportunities and barriers to increasing the recyclability of electronic devices; The designing of electronic devices to facilitate re-use and recycling; Making electronic devices safer and more environmentally friendly; The recycling or safe disposal of electronic devices and low-value materials recovered from such devices. Finally, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) would be responsible for developing a database for environmentally-friendly alternative materials for use in electronic devices, receiving $9 million for fiscal years 2010-2012 to carry out the project. Perhaps the most prominent amendment made to the original text involved substituting the phrase "electronic waste" with "electronic devices" throughout the bill, thus emphasizing the idea of recyclability and reusability over waste reduction. Under HR 1580, "electronic device" is defined to include computers, computer monitors, televisions, laptops, printers, wireless devices, copiers, fax machines, stereos, video gaming systems and the components of such devices.

The Bottle Recycling Climate Protection Act of 2009

Follow this link to view the bill: House Resolution 2046

Nutshell: U.S. Congressmen Ed Markey (D-Massachusetts) and Jim Moran (D-Virginia) have introduced a five-cent beverage container deposit measure to the U.S. House of Representatives. The bill places a nickel deposit on all alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverage containers under one gallon in size. States with beverage container redemption programs already in place are exempted, as long as they are able to top a 50-percent recycling rate for beverage containers for the first three years after the measure becomes law. The measure has received some surprising support with Aluminum Association chair Kevin Anton making telling American Metal Market that "Traditionally, [our] association and industry has been on the sidelines, choosing the let the free markets take over and drive things. But that just hasn't happened. "It's a difficult issue because the beverage companies aren't too keen on it," Anton continued. "Also, the grocery and retail stores don't want to become garbage collectors." According to the Container Recycling Institute, states with bottle bills in place have achieved beverage container recycling rates ranging from 50 percent to over 90 percent, compared to the national average of 34 percent.

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Community Highlight: El Prado Abiquiu Transfer Station

The El Prado Transfer Station is operated by the North Central Solid Waste Authority, based in Espanola and in charge of overseeing waste and recycling operations for Rio Arriba County and the city of Espanola. The transfer station was completed in 2007.

The transfer station provides a mixed recyclable container, followed by a glass dumpster, tire dumpster, a small storage shed that holds recycled oil and antifreeze drums, and then a scrap metal roll-off to the right.

Recycled Materials: Cardboard, Mixed Paper, Plastic Bottles #1 & #2, Aluminum Cans, Metal Food Containers, Scrap Metal, Tires and Motor Oil and Antifreeze. A long multi-slot roll-off accepts mixed recyclables of mixed paper, plastics #1&2, cardboard, aluminum and steel cans. Glass and tires have their own dumpster containers. A small shed is provided to store the motor oil and anti-freeze in 55-gallon drum containers. An open-top roll-off collects the scrap metal. There are no additional fees to recycle any of these materials.

Getting Clean Material: The station attendant at the Abiquiu El Prado Convenience Station works with the 10-20 daily residents to ensure that the recycled material goes where it belongs, is properly sorted and no contaminants enter the stream.

Hauling: NCSWA sends a replacement roll-off or dumpster when a recycling container is full. The material is then hauled to the La Loma Transfer Station. The mixed recyclables and the glass are then transported to Santa Fe’s Buckman Road Recycling and Transfer Station to be sorted, baled and marketed. The scrap metal is handled by Gallegos Scrap in Espanola or Capital Scrap in Santa Fe, the motor oil and antifreeze is collected by Thermo Fluids and the tires are baled at the Alcade or La Loma Transfer Stations.

Education and Outreach: Education includes a newsletter to residents, signs at the transfer stations and training by the transfer station attendants.

Contact information: Lawrence Lucero, Transfer Station Foreman, 505-747-8459. This information will be included in the soon-to-be-released Rural Recycling Resource Kit provided at the June 3rd Rural Recycling training and will be sent to all targeted rural communities in NM.

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Recycling Commodity Prices for May

Generation of OCC continues to fall below normal levels, but prices remained stable. Prices for other grades of paper remained stable as well, except for SOP which went down $5 per ST. Prices for plastics are getting a little better and more companies are looking for them again. Most materials are being accepted locally though prices remain low.

 

Cardboard…………......................$10-$45/ton

Newspaper……………………….….$10-$35/ton

Sorted Office Paper……..............$30-$60/ton

Mixed paper………………………….No payment, not accepting hard cover books

Shrink wrap………………………….$0.01-$0.035/lb

PET bottles (#1)…………………….. $0.005/lb accepting over 100 lbs of material only

Milk Jugs, natural HDPE (#2)………$0.03-$0.15/lb

Single color HDPE…………………..$0.01-$0.09/lb

Aluminum Cans………………………$0.32-$0.44/lb price changing on a daily basis

 

*Please note that this is a sample of what is being offered in New Mexico for certain commodities. Purchase prices for OCC and Paper are subject to change based on market fluctuations as reflected in the Southwest Region of the Official Board Markets’ Yellow Sheet. Prices vary according to presentation and quantity. These prices are for partial loads. Full truckloads of any of the materials would be paid at a greater price depending on the pick-up location and destination of the material.

 

Other resources:

http://www.wastenews.com/secondaryfiber/  

http://www.packaging-online.com/

 

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NMSU Wins Third Place in National RecycleMania Contest

 

NMSU's Main Campus has placed third in the "Grand Champion" category of RecycleMania. RecycleMania is a friendly competition and benchmarking tool for college and university recycling programs to promote waste reduction activities to their campus communities. Throughout the 10-week long competition, NMSU ranked anywhere from fifth to first within the division. Congratulations to program director Art Lucero and NMSU!!

 

Eastern New Mexico University also competed in the Benchmark division of RecycleMania.

To learn more about the contest, please visit the RecycleMania website at www.recyclemania.com.  For further background on the categories, divisions and how they are calculated, consult the Rules section of the website at: http://www.recyclemaniacs.org/rules.htm.  

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Scraps Newsletter Sponsored by Dex

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Garbage Gold
Albuquerque Journal, May 2, 2009. By Amanda Schoenberg


Starting a compost pile in the backyard requires little more than redirecting kitchen scraps and yard waste. Just ask Greg Baker, an environmental scientist and compost specialist for the New Mexico Environmental Department. He has been composting for at least 35 years and jokes that he has the best tomatoes on his block to prove it. "I've been called the compost guru," he admits, laughing.


Composting is the process of allowing organic matter to decompose into soil. To begin the process, Baker uses straw bales to surround his two piles of organic matter on three sides. He uses two piles so he can start one while working the other into his garden. Other options are wood frames with screens on all sides, shipping pallets or plastic bins. All methods should have holes on the sides to allow oxygen into the pile but should be covered to keep the pile warm and moist.


Just add water
One of the biggest mistakes New Mexicans make is not keeping the pile moist, Baker says.      Compost should be the consistency of a wrung-out sponge, according to the city of Albuquerque's guide to backyard composting. The pile should be watered as needed and at least every time it is turned, about every two to three weeks. "The biggest problem is letting it dry out," Baker says. "You've got to keep it moist." According to Baker, when starting a new pile, mix 6-inch layers of food scraps, leaves and yard clippings, watering well between each new layer. The pile should be wet all the way through, not just on the top. When adding to the pile, most organic materials that will decompose are fair game. Toss in tea bags, coffee filters, paper towels and vegetable peels but not meat, fat, oils, dairy or wood ash.

 
Jim Brooks, owner of Soilutions, a green waste recycler and compost manufacturer in the South Valley, often works with Baker to explain composting to the public. He frequently promotes what he calls the "dump and run" method — gathering scraps like the morning's grapefruit or last night's strawberries and tossing them on top of the compost pile as quickly as possible before they start to lose moisture. That way less water is required to keep the pile moist. Unfinished cups of tea or coffee or dishwater all go into his compost bin, Brooks says.


The worms crawl in
The composting process is like a Pac-Man game — bacteria gobble up carbon for energy and grab nitrogen to build cell bodies, Brooks explains. Fungi, protozoa and bugs also join bacteria in breaking down decaying material. A compost bin with only carbon-based products (like dry leaves or wood chips) or nitrogen-rich items (like kitchen scraps) will take longer to turn into compost. A compost pile should be turned frequently to ensure the breakdown of organic ingredients. Baker is also a fan of vermicomposting — adding red worms to the pile speeds up the process, he says. The worms keep the pile aerated, and it needs less turning. A few worms can be a long-lasting investment. "I've had my worms 20 years, and I just started with one coffee can," Baker says. If it has been kept moist and turned often, compost can be ready in a few weeks. Dark-brown compost called humus often settles to the bottom of the pile and should smell "like the forest floor," Baker says. When it is finished, compost can be used as a soil conditioner or added to potting soil. Composting has grown in popularity due to a variety of factors, including the rising cost of solid waste disposal and the growth of the organic movement, Baker says.

 
Reducing waste
At the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority's soil amendment facility on the West Side, superintendent Joe Bailey sells about 2.4 million pounds of compost every month to various users — from golf courses and vineyards to public schools and backyard gardeners. To create the compost, green waste is mixed with treated wastewater and bedding material from horse stalls at Expo New Mexico, which includes manure, sawdust and straw. After four to six weeks of frequent turning, the high-quality compost is ready. "When you sprinkle it on grass, it gets a dark, dark green color," Bailey says.

At Soilutions, Brooks says he has sold more of his organic compost for residential use and also has recycled more organic waste from local businesses in the past year. But the U.S. still may have a way to go. Baker points out that on a recent trip to Switzerland, he saw compost bins used everywhere — in the middle of apartment complexes and in small containers in many kitchens. There, a roll of garbage bags costs $40, he says. Baker suggests that if we paid as much here, we might be more inclined to start composting. Advocates say less waste in landfills is one good reason to start composting. In Albuquerque, about 20 percent of what ends up in the landfill is yard waste, according to the city's Web site. Compost also keeps soil moist and increases permeability, which helps reduce runoff and erosion, Brooks says. "A person can reduce the waste that goes to landfills," says Brooks. "Then there's a carrot at the end of the stick — at the end of doing this good thing, you get good compost. It makes vegetables grow better and it conserves water. You have the ability to improve your soil over time, if you keep on using that compost."


Local resources
To get started with composting, the New Mexico Environment Department has information and brochures to download. Go to www.nmenv.state.nm.us, then visit the Solid Waste Bureau page, listed under programs. Composting and Mulch is one of the headings on the left. Call the Environment Department at 827-0197 for free brochures, presentations or workshops. Albuquerque's Solid Waste Department also offers free brochures at its office at 4600 Edith NE or visit cabq.gov/solidwaste. For people who just want to get rid of yard waste, Soilutions recycles green waste into compost and mulch at 9008 Bates SE. Dropping off a cubic yard of green waste, sod or dirt costs $5. One cubic-foot bag of compost costs $5.95. Call 877-0220 or see soilutions.net for more information. The city also will pick up residential green waste next Monday through Friday and May 11-15, on regular trash days. Put leaves, grass and brush in trash bags that weigh less than 40 pounds. Branches should be bundled and cut to less than 4 feet long. The city won't pick up dirt, construction debris, gravel or landscape materials. At other times of year, residents can bring yard waste to the city's three convenience centers. For information, see cabq.gov/solidwaste.
       

 

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in the Santa Fe New Mexican

By Kathy Holian

We throw things away. We throw lots of things away. But there is no "away." All of our "throw-away" trash goes somewhere. And, as land and space get more valuable, the cost of throwing things away will rise. In Santa Fe County, people have gotten used to very low fees for disposing of solid waste. These fees are significantly less than in neighboring counties, including Rio Arriba. Our Solid Waste Management Division is running huge deficits, on the order of $2 million per year. We would like for the Solid Waste Management to be an "enterprise operation" — that is, to pay for itself with the fees that it takes in. I believe in the principle that people should pay the true cost of services that they receive. That is the surest way for people truly to comprehend the consequences of their actions — in this case, disposing of their unwanted "stuff."


I am aware that much of the trash that people generate is not necessarily of their choosing. For example, the sheer amount of packaging that accompanies everything we buy is unprecedented. But people can also make different choices: We can choose to recycle the extraordinary number of beverage cans and bottles. We can buy things in bulk and put them in reusable containers. We can choose not to use disposable plates and cutlery for our next party. We can compost our table scraps to make soil for our gardens. There are so many ways in which we can cut down on the trash that we create that goes into the landfill. But most of us won't be motivated to do that unless we get signals that tell us that it costs money — our money — to throw everything "away."


The fairest way to encourage recycling — and discourage landfill use — is to make recycling free and to charge for landfill trash by weight, though that would require investing in new equipment. But we can start by making recycling free and charging more for landfill trash. I propose that we charge an annual fee, closer to what other counties do, for unlimited trips to county transfer stations. For people who cut down on their solid waste, and for those who can't afford the higher fee for unlimited throwaway trips, there should be a choice for a 10-trip-per-year pass that costs far less than the unlimited pass. In addition, by making recycling free, we make a strong statement of our values. Also, per ton, recycling costs the county less than half the fee to dump waste into the landfill.


What about the worry of increased illegal dumping in arroyos or littering along roads? We should hope that people's pride in their environment is higher now than ever before; nevertheless, we will need to monitor and increase enforcement of fines, if necessary. I just want to end with the thought that Nature is much better organized than we human beings. In the natural world, there is no "trash." Anything that is a waste product from one plant or animal is an input to some other plant or animal. There is a new movement in human ecology called "Cradle to Cradle." (That's right — not cradle to grave.) I think you can guess what that means: In order to be truly sustainable, mankind will have to say goodbye forever to the obsolete notion of "out-of-sight, out-of-mind," "disposable" trash. We will need to become more in tune with Nature's way of recycling.

Holian is Santa Fe County Commissioner from District 4.

   

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in the Rio Rancho Observer
Keep Rio Rancho Beautiful recently received a gift it can use again and again.

The New Mexico Recycling Coalition recently awarded 1,250 recycling bins to 17 communities and organizations throughout the state. The bins, donated to NMRC by the National Recycling Coalition and Alcoa Recycling Company, will be placed in a variety of settings where bins had not previously been available, including schools, Indian lands, government and office buildings and low-income communities. The recycling bin grant, which was open to NMRC’s 260 members, invited members to submit applications for the 22-gallon lidless recycling bins.

KRRB received 84 recycling bins to place in public schools within Rio Rancho that have a recycling program or environmental club but lack recycling containers. Santo Domingo tribe also received 84 bins to collect aluminum cans at service stations, the tribe’s health clinic, school and tribal offices. Additionally, the tribe is planning on starting a curbside collection program for residents.

On average, 33 percent of the national waste stream (aggregate flow of waste material of from generation to treatment to final disposition) is recycled, while New Mexico only diverts 11 percent of its waste stream from landfills. The NMRC is hoping that the donation of these bins will help make recycling more accessible to New Mexicans.

“It’s amazing how something as simple as a well-marked recycling bin can positively affect a community’s recycling program,” said Sarah Pierpont, NMRC’s deputy director. “Most people know that recycling saves energy, water and natural resources, and they want to do the right thing. It’s just a matter of making recycling convenient and easy.”

Working with the state affiliates of the NRC, Alcoa provided approximately 25,000 recycling bins across the country.

“Alcoa greatly appreciates the role of NRC and the state recycling organizations in promoting recycling,” said Greg Wittbecker, director of corporate recycling strategy for Alcoa. “We gain the opportunity to work with the states, which can quickly identify locations where recycling bins can do the most good. To save energy and address climate change, we all depend on the decisions of consumers everywhere to recycle rather than throw away these precious resources. Alcoa is pleased to be part of the effort that makes it possible.”

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NRC board makes move toward KAB partnership

Resource Recycling, May 7, 2009

The National Recycling Coalition's Board of Directors announced today that it will pursue a formal relationship with Keep America Beautiful, Inc.

 

The decision follows the coalition's announcement made yesterday that it's canceling this year's Congress and Expo, in addition to previously-reported financial troubles the organization finds itself in. Other options considered included downsizing, partnership with other, unnamed organizations and closing operations. NRC staff are presently drafting a proposal to distribute to members and member organizations for discussion and voting.

 

A schedule for the proposed marriage was not released, though Ed Skernolis, the coalition's acting executive director since last July, said, "We have a rough timeline — nothing cast in concrete — that can be summarized as 'quickly, but prudently,'" perhaps looking to have a proposal ready for membership to consider in around a month.

 

Skernolis said that feedback was immediate, with many characterized as "passionate," and many falling into the "supportive" camp. "We have a passionate membership, and there's a lot of history to this organization," noted Skernolis. "People are going to have a lot of questions, such as 'what does the organization going to look like? How is it going to be governed? What happens to memberships? What's the budget?'"

 

"We want people to be patient," says Skernolis. "Give us a chance to present a comprehensive proposal that lays out all the things that we think are going to be of interest to our membership. Members, of course, are going to be able to give us feedback on the proposal. It's an engagement process, nothing has been decided, nothing can go forward, nor do we want anything to go forward without giving the members the opportunity to vote and, officially or unofficially, speak their mind."

 

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Welcome to New Members 2009

Bill Booth, Ditch Witch; John Zarola; Pueblo of Tesuque Environment Department; Nathan Lee and Norman Scott, Navajo Nation; Butch Steinman, Village of Angel Fire; Josh Montano and  Kimberly Foree, OSO Biopharmaceuticals; David Friedman, Friedman Recycling; Rodney Mullens, Mesa Verde Enterprises; Beverly Booth McCauley; Charley Carroll, NM Junior College; Joe Capone, All American Waste Removal; Suzanne Michaels; Adrian Marufo, City of Gallup; Roger Allen; Michael Candelaria, Pueblo of Isleta; Melissa Villalobos, Western NM Correctional Facility; Rick Smith, Laguna Pueblo; Mindy Cahill, Village of Cimarron; Maralyn Hillman, Trucks West; Clifford Dowling, Waste Management; Kathy Elmore, Carlsbad Caverns National Park

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Grants and Loans

State Loans

NMED Constructions Programs Bureau offers low-interest loans for solid waste projects: http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/cpb/rip.html .

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Regional Round-Up

 

Arizona: The Arizona Recycling Coalition is hosting their annual conference August 17-18 in Phoenix. Go to www.arizonarecyclingcoalition.com for more information.

 

SWANA - NM Roadrunner Chapter is hosting the New Mexico Transfer Station Operator Certification Class is scheduled for Tuesday June 16 through Thursday, June 18, 2009 in Room 120 at Eastern NM University in Ruidoso, New Mexico.  To register go to http://www.nmswana.com/swana_training.htm

 

Submit your community's news by emailing english@recyclenewmexico.com . We love to hear about news from around the state!

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Recycling Tidbits

Ga. companies to make recycled carpet backing fillers

April 20 -- A couple of Georgia companies are teaming up to manufacture carpet backing fillers with post-consumer content.   Moreģ

 

Safety-Kleen´s recycled motor oil available to consumers

April 21 -- Safety-Kleen is now making its recycled motor oil available to consumers.   Moreģ

 

Call for Papers - 25th International Conference on Solid Waste Technology & Management, Philadelphia, PA March 14-17, 2010

For more information or to submit an abstract for oral or poster presentation, please go to www.widener.edu/solid.waste.

 

San Francisco achieves 72% recycling rate in 2007

May 13 -- San Francisco achieved the nation's highest recycling rate at 72% in 2007, according to Mayor Gavin Newsom.   Moreģ

 

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Calendar

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Recycling and Composting Facility Operator Certification Class Schedule for 2009

 

Recycling Certification Courses

December 8-10, Albuquerque

 

Composting Certification Courses

October 20-22, Santa Fe

 

To register, please go to www.recyclenewmexico.com/cert_classes.htm

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If you have questions about any of the above information or have articles for future Recycling Scraps, please e-mail or call me.

English Bird, Executive Director

New Mexico Recycling Coalition

PO Box 24364, Santa Fe, NM 87502

english@recyclenewmexico.com

(505) 983-4470 

   

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