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Recycling Scraps
March 31, 2011

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June 9th Recycling Training - Hub & Spoke Recycling: The Next Generation

Please join NMRC for a FREE recycling training on June 9th from 9am to 4pm at the UNM Science & Technology Park Rotunda in Albuquerque. The training will focus on Pay -As-You-Throw, NMRC's Rural Recycling Resources (R3) Cooperative and rural recycling. Following the meeting R3 Co-op existing and potential members will meet for one hour to discuss details of being members of the Co-op.

Afternoon sessions will include "Getting Quality Material From the Public", "Setting Up Household Hazardous Waste Collection" and "Launching a ReUse Collection Program".

$50 travel stipends are available for 75 eligible rural communities on a first-come-first-served basis. Find out if your community is eligible, learn more and register at http://www.recyclenewmexico.com/recyclingtraining2011.htm

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Help NMRC Celebrate Its 20th Anniversary - NMRC Coming of Age

* June 9, 2011 * Dinner * Stories from the Past 20 Years * Recycling Awards *

The New Mexico Recycling Coalition (NMRC) is celebrating its 20th anniversary!  NMRC will mark this milestone at O’Niell’s Pub in Albuquerque (4310 Central SE in Nob Hill) on June 9th (6 pm to 9 pm) during an evening filled with good food, old and new friends, memories from the past 20 years and a cash bar.  

The past 20 years has seen: membership grow from less than 50 to over 260 municipalities, tribes, businesses, state and federal government entities, non-profits and individuals; creation of November’s NM Recycling Awareness Month; support of NM’s Solid Waste Act; securing of federal funding to promote and develop rural recycling; outreach throughout the state to provide technical recycling assistance; the staff grow from zero to four employees; the development of the NM Recycling Conference and more! 

Help mark these and other accomplishments by attending the celebration event!

Registration required and the cost is $35 per person. Register

Click here to learn about sponsorship opportunities. Sponsors can register directly on the main registration page more

Recycler of the Year, Community Recycler of the Year and Business Recycler of the Year Awards will be given out at the celebration. Nominate someone today by clicking on the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/R6GNNFY  

Thank you to our generous premier event sponsors:

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Rethinking Glass Bottle Recycling in New Mexico

An editorial from Lynn Bragg (pictured above), new president of the Glass Packaging Institute

As New Mexico ramps up recycling efforts in large and small communities, including using a hub-and-spoke model, with 2010 federal grant funding to the New Mexico Recycling Coalition, it’s worth paying attention to glass container recycling, especially over the long haul. Here’s why. 

First, glass is 100% recyclable.  It’s one of the few materials that can be recycled infinitely without losing strength, purity, or quality.  Glass containers are now also significantly lighter.  It also makes environmental sense to recycle glass.  In late 2008, the North American glass container manufacturers completed a life cycle analysis, which showed the significant environmental benefits of using increasing amounts of recycled glass, called cullet, in the production of new glass bottles and jars.  More use of recycled glass reduces CO2 emissions, lessens energy demand at manufacturing facilities, and offsets transportation emissions. 

In response, glass manufacturers  are focused on increasing glass recycling and incorporating more recycled glass in the glass containers they produce—and they’re starting to see a little payoff.  Glass recycling stood at 28% in 2008. Data released in early 2011 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency now show that all glass container recycling jumped to 31.1% in 2009.  Nearly 40% of glass beer and soft drink bottles were recycled, 18.1% of wine and liquor bottles, and about 18% of other glass bottles and jars.  In states with container deposit programs, the average recycling rate for glass beverage containers is over 63%, according to the Container Recycling Institute.

Second, glass containers are a perfect match for drop-off type programs.  This kind of collection system is able to keep the quality of the recovered glass high—whether collected color sorted or mixed—allowing it to be used for remanufacture into new glass containers and other high-value uses.  Research in the cities of Fort Collins and Loveland, CO and Larimer County, CO found that the glass capture rates for single-stream recycling may only reach 30%, but it’s almost 100% for drop-off recycling.  In Kansas City, MO, where there is no curbside collection of glass, resident drop off glass bottles and jars at one of over 70 retail and community locations.  More than 1,200 tons/month of recycled glass is collected through this system and then used in the production of fiberglass and new glass bottles.

Finally, while there may be questions about adequate markets for glass in New Mexico, the need for high-quality, recycled glass containers is high and a sufficient quantity and consistent supply of clean recycled glass will be a likely draw for glass processors looking for ways to meet cullet demand.   Right now, there are 76 cullet processors in 30 states, with more locations expected in 2011. This is a 20% increase since 2008, including facilities now in six additional states. And cullet processors with optical sorting technologies have more than doubled.  While facilities are not located in New Mexico, they are in all the bordering states, Texas, Arizona, Colorado, and Oklahoma.

GPI has also partnered with Earth911 to help recycling officials and residents learn more about the value of glass container recycling.  Check out the Earth911 glass recycling page [link to http://earth911.com/recycling/glass/].  As Earth911 President Corey Lambrecht says, “Recycling is one of the most accessible, sustainable actions that the everyday person can take.”  We hope that New Mexico residents will join with GPI and its member companies to help us boost glass bottle recycling. 

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Curbside Recycling Begins in Las Cruces April 4th!

Thirty-thousand homes in the city of Las Cruces with city trash pickup, received curbside recycling bins in March!  With curbside recycling, comes an expanded list of recyclables, and a new program: “Recycle Right!”

“Recycle Right!” is being launched in Las Cruces and El Paso in a concerted effort to be sure consistent information is going out to all recyclers in the area.  Morris Friedman, President/COO of Friedman Recycling, says, “Especially with our new, larger list of recyclables, we’re doing everything possible to spread the word about what’s recyclable and what’s not.”

The new LABEL identifying the expanded list of recyclables – including clean and empty Plastics 1 through 7, small electronics, and pots and pans – can be viewed at www.TheScrappyPages.com for details about what’s now recyclable and what’s not, under “Residential Recycling”.

Friedman reminds Las Cruces area residents, “Please, make sure all recyclables are clean and empty.  Our biggest enemy in the recycling business is food contamination.  A huge problem is peanut butter jars and dog food cans with food left inside – substantial food residue can degrade an entire load of recyclables.” 

Las Cruces curbside pickup begins the week of April 4th. Check out the great ad the city is running to promote participation in their new curbside program

www.recyclenewmexico.com/Jack&Lupe.wmv (you'll need a media player to see the ad)

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NMRC Members Eligible For Up To 40% Off Rubermaid Recycling Bins

Recycling Organizations of North America (RONA) and Rubbermaid are working together on take-back programs for spent containers, better container design and production, and best management practices to share. Rubbermaid has also established a procurement relationship with major North American distributors that will provide RONA members discounts of up to 40 percent off of list price in the following categories: Recycling Containers, Utility Containers, Indoor Decorative Containers, Outdoor Containers, Cube Trucks, Tilt Trucks & Mega Brutes.  All pricing is in case quantity.

NMRC is a member of RONA, a requirement to take advantage of this discounted pricing. All NMRC members may enjoy this benefit. There is a $500 minimum order requirement to get the discount. To learn more, please visit http://recyclingorganizations.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80&Itemid=129

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Cibola County Recycling Moves into Second Year

From the Cibola County Beacon – With less litter and reduced demand on the regional landfill, the future is looking brighter,  according to recycling advocates.

On a breezy, mild March day more than 50 community members made the trip to the downtown Grants’ location where volunteers helped deposit items into new bins and answered recycling questions. Talking about community participation at the City of Grants’ community drop-off site, several RecycleCibola members remarked, “More and more people are serious about recycling.”

.Two giant blue roll-off canisters, each divided into three compartments, received a variety of “waste” items including mixed paper, plastics numbers one through five, corrugated cardboard and aluminum and steel cans.

The March 5 event was just another step toward reducing demands on the landfill and generating money to continue the recycling program said one RecycleCibola volunteer.

The collected materials are marketed through specific outlets and the proceeds are used to continue funding the countywide program. “The volume of the waste stream and market demand are the driving factors that dictate what we can accept for recycling,” explained Hollis Fleischer, one of RecycleCibola’s originators. She said that corrugated cardboard is sold to Bio-Pappel, in McKinley County, and a Show Low, Ariz., company purchases the mixed paper.

She acknowledged the community-based group’s progress in the past 12 months. “We have gone from a bunch of folks interested in recycling to forming an active alliance with Cibola and McKinley Counties, City of Grants, Village of Milan and the Northwest New Mexico Regional Solid Waste Authority.” 

Fleischer, a community volunteer, recalled that area residents have been very supportive of the group’s efforts. “Elected officials, especially Mayor Joe Murrietta, have really helped make all this (the recycling program) successful,” she said.

She pointed out that part of the group’s community education program involves working with the city to include recycling information and drop-off site’s schedule in the municipality’s water and garbage bills.

The organization is currently pursuing three funding sources, which include federal and state project dollars along with a private-public grant. Receiving the federal money would provide roll-off containers to expand recycling options to other parts of the county.

Fleischer noted that under the state grant, the NNMRSWA purchased 100 recycle bins, at 96-gallons capacity, for use in public places and for special events. Future plans include purchasing smaller receptacles, 30-40 gallon size, for use at various venues. These would be used for collecting beverage containers such as plastic and glass bottles and aluminum cans.

“Our group is working with the community to arrange for the placement of bins at government complexes, schools, community centers, and recreational facilities. We expect this to occur in the winter and spring of 2011.  Immediate plans include canvassing area business owners to sponsor smaller receptacles at their establishments,” said Fleischer.

“We are hoping for Milan's downtown center to open this spring, but we don't know if they'll have exactly the same equipment as the Grants’ location.  It will depend on the other grants we are applying for and the equipment recommended by the NNMRSWA,” explained Fleischer. “Milan is definitely next on our list and we hope to open there soon.”

Another potential source of funding is the Coca-Cola and Keep America Beautiful grant. It would provide bins in the schools and government buildings and for special events.

These containers are known as “clear-stream” and are designed to accept only specific items such as plastic beverage bottles, aluminum cans or newspapers.

But community volunteers have not been sitting around waiting for grant funding. They have begun developing recycling programs in the area’s school buildings. Both Grants High and Mount Taylor Elementary Schools have recently implemented “recycling” practices for students and staff. Fleischer noted that Los Alamitas Middle School is next on the contact list.

See Friday’s Beacon for information as to where residents can participate in recycling.

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NMED: Solid Waste Bureau's 2010 Solid Waste Report Available Online

Curious how many tons of material were recycled in New Mexico by commodity or the recycling rate by county or what projects the RAID grant funded this past year? Check out the 2010 New Mexico Solid Waste Report produced by the NM Environment Department: Solid Waste Bureau. The 2010 report is the most up-to-date statewide snapshop of recycling and solid waste in New Mexico and is now available online at http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/swb/documents/2010AnnualReport1.24.11.pdf

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Junked Bikes Get New Lease

New Mexico Daily Lobo - Five students who needed transportation, or were tired of emitting pollution, got free bikes March 5 to use for the semester.

Student Matthew Wilder developed LoboBike, an upstart program where he and his partner Richard Rivas fix bikes that would otherwise take up space at the landfill. Rivas started recycling bikes about seven years ago. Wilder adapted the idea and brought it to campus, and he said the project encourages sustainable lifestyles and gives to the needy.

“Reducing carbon emissions on campus is my main goal,” he said. “But I also wanted to help individual students. Foreign exchange students are a target market because they don’t have driver’s licenses and can’t work, so bikes are essential.”

Rivas said his partnership with Wilder has been successful. So far, the program has given away nine bikes. Rivas said he has connections with a local land!ll, and workers collect bikes and parts and call him to pick them up. He said they recycle about 25 to 30 bikes per month.

““The supply is unlimited — it really is,” he said. “All we need are more volunteers to !x up more bikes.” Wilder said he wants LoboBike to become a permanent fixture at UNM.

“I’m trying to work with the (UNM) Department of Transportation,” Wilder said. ““They have said they are the (most) sustainable, green department on campus, so I’m hoping they will eventually want to take over. “Then, the program could maybe get some school funding, too.” Wilder said he will have a booth at the Sustainability Expo on April 21 where students can choose a free bike.

Students who want to rent a bike need to !ll out an application that states they will obey all traffic laws, wear a helmet, buy a lock, and do any “reasonable maintenance” on the bike if necessary. Wilder also asks that renters send him a report of their weekly miles. “The contract states that if the bike is stolen, the renter is not responsible for replacing the bike.

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Sign Up Now for the 2011 Recycling and Composting Facility Operator Certification Courses

The NMRC and the New Mexico State Environment Department: Solid Waste Bureau will host two recycling courses and two composting courses in 2011. These courses provide an in-depth look at the science, safety, administration and operations of both recycling and composting operations.

Recycling Facility Operators Certification Courses

May 17-19, Ruidoso register

Held at Eastern NM University with a tour of Greentree Recycling Center.

 

*December 6-8, Santa Fe register   Held at the Genoveva Chavez Community Center with a tour of the Buckman Road Recycling and Transfer Station

 

Compost Facility Operators Certification Courses

April 12-14, Ruidoso register  

Held at Eastern NM University with a tour of BioGrind facility.

 

*October 4-6, Albuquerque register  

Held at the Fire Academy with a tour of Soilutions & the Soil Amendment Facility.

*Please note that the December & October certification classes are tentative awaiting final budget approval on July 1. Please still sign up for the classes and we will follow up with you asap.

 

Our maximum class size is 35 studetns so please remember to register as early as possible to be assured a seat in the course.


Learn more and sign up today at http://www.recyclenewmexico.com/cert_classes.htm

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Ruidoso Recognized as National Leader in Recycling Efforts

From Waste Management World & Ruidoso News - Ruidoso may be a natinoal leader on recycling, thanks in part to its yard waste program. "We'll be sending a notice to the state. The Village of Ruidoso is at a 55 percent recycling rate," said Jeff Kaplan, solid waste and general services director. "The State of California has a zero waste goal. The leader in this country with recycling, they average around 51 percent recycling."

A recent annual report to the New Mexico Environment Department indicated the village collected 18,931 tons of waste, both garbage and materials that can be recycled, in 2010. Of the amount, 8,429 tons ended up in the Otero/Lincoln County Regional Landfill south of Alamogordo.

Village Manager Debi Lee said the report includes details like the savings achieved through recycling. "He averages 35 tons per trip at a cost of around $400 a round trip," Village Manager Debi Lee said of the shipments that go to the landfill.

"And gas is going up and we're all worried about it and we're all going to be sensitive to it."

In addition to $213,163 in disposal fees at the landfill last year, the transportation costs were more than $96,000. The village recycled 3,436 tons of cardboard, newsprint and plastics in 2010, which saved $47,760 in disposal fees and $39,270 in hauling costs, for a total savings of $87,030.

"This savings is very encouraging as we continue our recycling efforts," Lee said.

More than 165 commercial and residential recycling dumpsters, painted blue, are located around the village. Commercial customers can request recycling dumpsters at their business location.

Cardboard represented 3,112 tons of materials diverted from the landfill because of recycling. Newsprint accounted for 321 tons and plastics 2.5 tons in 2010.

Kaplan said 6,857 tons of pine needles, brush and green waste were collected by the village's grapple trucks.

The yard waste, representing 36 percent of what was collected by the solid waste department last year, was turned into mulch and compost at Sierra Contracting.

"Eighteen percent is going through to the Greentree Solid Waste (Authority) and that's the plastics and the cardboard," Kaplan said. "Debi was eluding to the amount of money that we save as a result of this. "When you consider that we do 19,000 tons of collection of solid waste in this community, and over 54 percent of it is not going to the landfill, that's something to be proud of."

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Checkout This Great Recycling Flashmob

See what happens when you combine an act of recycling and some creativity in Canada at http://wimp.com/recyclingbottle/

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Prescription Drug Recycling Updates - Pharmacies, Company Create Prescription Mailback & SB37 Passes in the Roundhouse

From Waste & Recycling News - Rite Aid pharmacies and Sharps Compliance Corp. have created a new nationwide mail-back program for unused, outdated or unwanted prescription and over-the-counter drugs.

Consumers can purchase special mailing envelopes for $3.99 at U.S. Rite Aid locations in every state except for Maine, where a separate program is in place. The purchase price includes cost of mailing the envelope through the U.S. Postal Service.

"For years, Rite Aid has participated in community medication take-back events organized by local health officials and law enforcement agencies," said Dan Miller, Rite Aid senior vice president of pharmacy. "Our customers often ask how to dispose of medication. By making these envelopes available in our stores, we´re offering an easy and safe disposal solution for customers looking to safely dispose of expired, unused or unwanted medications."

Controlled medications are excluded from this program due to current federal regulations.
Rite Aid operates more than 4,700 stores in 31 states and the District of Columbia.

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Additionally Senate Bill 37 passed the NM legislature this session and provides for prescription drug donations by enacting a new section of the NM Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act. Unused prescription drugs (in tamper-evident packaging) may be donated to a clinic or a participating practitioner and a clinic or a participating practitioner may accept and redistribute the donated prescription drugs in accordance with rules promulgated by an advisory board. The bill is currently awaiting the Governor's signature. Read the full legislation at http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/11%20Regular/bills/senate/SB0037.pdf

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Are Your Nikes Greener Than Your Adidas?

From the Wall Street Journal -   There will soon be an answer to this question, if the manufacturers have their way. A group of roughly 100 well-known apparel brands and retailers have developed a software tool to help them measure the environmental impact of their apparel and footwear, from raw material to garbage dump.

Ultimately, the companies hope to display an eco-value on a tag or package, much like the Energy Star rating of appliances' efficiency.   The Eco Index will be rolled out next month at the Outdoor Retailer trade show in Salt Lake City. The idea is to give manufacturers a common way to look at environment and human-rights impacts when designing their products.

Consumers won't immediately be able to see how brands rate. The companies won't say exactly when they'll be ready to go public with the Eco Index, which has been in the works for three years. But eventually, it could help shoppers compare how green garments are.

Sustainability has proven to be a powerful motivator for consumption of everything from Prius vehicles to conflict-free diamonds and Method household cleaners. It's also been shown to be an effective way to lure shoppers to try new products.

Of course, no eco index will convince people to wear unattractive clothes, no matter how green they are. But a high rating might cinch the decision between a pair of Levi's and Wranglers or attract green-minded consumers to other new brands.

But the coalition participating in the index counts a broad swath of the apparel industry. The brands include retail giants like Levi Strauss & Co., Nike Inc. and Target Corp., as well as outdoor-wear makers like Brooks Sports, Adidas AG, Timberland Co., REI, Columbia Sportswear Co. and Patagonia Inc., according to the companies and industry-group committees. Outdoorsy companies have plenty of employees – and customers -- who are attuned to environmental issues.

Apparel doesn't sound like a dirty industry, but its manufacturing has huge global consequences. Tanning leather often involves toxic chemicals. Making synthetic fabrics such as polyester uses large amounts of crude oil and other materials that release volatile compounds. Cotton-growing is water-intensive -- and cotton is often shipped from the U.S. and Europe to Asia to make thread and fabric, then shipped elsewhere for cutting and elsewhere again for sewing. Some of our clothes have circled the globe twice by the time they arrive in stores.

Increasingly, environmentalists think we should also count the costs at the other end of clothing's life: the garbage dump. Americans tossed out 12.4 million tons of textiles in 2008 -- a number that has risen far faster than other sources of trash, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Our consumption habits were a lot more sustainable back in 1960, when we tossed out only 1.8 million tons of textiles.

The Eco Index, which is basically a software tool any apparel maker can use, poses a series of questions to companies on their environmental and labor practices -- some of which require answers from the companies' suppliers. It then assigns a score representing a percentage of a perfect score.

The questions cover every step in the life of a product, from raw-material production to manufacturing, shipping, and even disposal. For instance, Levi's gets points for having a recycling program that lets consumers drop off their old jeans at Goodwill, and Timberland earns points for using leather tanneries that have wastewater-purifying systems. Points are lost for using bulky packing material or transporting goods long distances. The Eco Index also includes estimates of how consumers will wash and eventually dispose of their clothes.

Some of the points are awarded for changes with very speculative impact. Levi's care tags ask consumers to wash in cold water, line-dry and donate to Goodwill. All of that earns Levi's points on the Eco Index. But that doesn't necessarily make Levi's greener than a pair of Wranglers, which can just as easily be dropped off at the Salvation Army.

Participants also say the survey involves a lot of estimates and isn't as detailed as it could be, a result of the many types of brands it covers. The production process for shoes doesn't share many elements with the production of a shirt. All the information is self-reported, and the companies don't have to provide proof.

Energy Star ratings, which were created by the EPA in 1992, are also estimates, but they have become an international standard. For the same thing to happen with the Eco Index, it must be made available to shoppers at the point of sale.

Levi's vice president of social and environmental sustainability, Michael Kobori, says the tool will be available "as soon as we can get everybody to agree" on how to publish and communicate it. This sounds about as easy as herding cats, given the numerous brands involved. It's one thing, many companies say, to use the data internally, but quite another to trumpet it to the world. They want to be sure everyone communicates the data in the same way. For instance, they don't agree on whether the index should be communicated as a single number on a hang tag or in a more detailed manner that might involve directing customers to data on the Web.

"It's got to be uniform in order to be useful," says Rick Ridgeway, vice president of environmental initiatives for Patagonia.

To use the index, companies must pepper their suppliers with questions about materials use, labor standards, and recycling. These suppliers get points or ratings such as "gold," "silver," and bronze." Timberland started seeking out leather tanneries with more sustainable standards, says Betsy Blaisdell, Timberland's senior manager of environmental stewardship. "I now have tanneries fighting over the points needed to get a silver rating," she says.

As part of its participation in the Eco Index, Levi's did a separate internal study of its own practices. As a result, Levi's changed its transportation routes last year to make them more efficient and reduced carbon emissions by 700 metric tons. In addition to the Goodwill agreement, Levi's also cut back on packaging, allowing only three pieces of labeling with the jeans -- a back-pocket tag, a size sticker, and a price tag.

Brooks redesigned its shoe boxes after finding that its score wasn't as high as it had hoped. When the shoe boxes earned a score of roughly 40%, footwear operations manager Chase Mueller went to work to improve it.   Among other changes, Brooks got rid of the moisture-absorbing silica bags, which turned out to be ineffective, and stopped stuffing the insides of shoes with tissue paper. As an added benefit, the "green" changes reduced the cost of the shoe box by 38%.   In this instance, the index appears to be working. Mr. Mueller is now looking to create a recycling program for Brooks's shoe boxes. "I'd like
[the score] to be much higher," he says.

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Goodwill Employees Make Recycled Cards

At Paperworks Studio (a program of Goodwill) workers transform old blue jeans, coffee and flower petals into one-of-a-kind handmade greeting cards. View their production video at  www.recyclenewmexico.com/Paperworks_studio_video.wmv (you will need a media player to see the video).

Brian Lewis from Paperwork Studios notes that, "The cards are gorgeous and the textures amazing, but when customers meet our incredible production team (they are on the video), customers fall in love with Paperworks Studio.  Our employees get to learn life and work skills, build self-esteem, and help gain independence."

The group can create custom cards and can provide a 10% discount or 10% donation to a charity. For details contact Brian Lewis at BrianL@goodwillnmi.org or 231-995-7757 or www.paperworksstudio.com.

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Recycling Officials Say Resin Codes Confuse Consumers

From Waste & Recycling News -- While ASTM International Inc. continues to deliberate slowly over changes to the 23-year-old resin identification code, an overwhelming majority of municipality and state recycling officials recently surveyed say the current codes are "confusing to the public and hinder recycling efforts."

Specifically, 82% said that "people think everything with the same number should be recyclable whether it is a bottle, tub or toy, and 78% said that people thin that "chasing arrows mean something is recyclable."

Another 68% said that there was also a "lack of consistency" in programs within a region as to what can and can´t be recycled.

The survey, done for the Bureau of Waste Prevention Reuse and Recycling of the Department of Sanitation for the city of New York, represents recycling officials from at least 29 states.

Of the 334 surveyed, 199 represented local governments, 42 state governments, 18 material recovery facilities (MRFs) and 11 private recyclers. The other 64 were from a mix of consultants, businesses, universities and non-profits, private citizens and federal and regional government representatives.

Almost three-quarters -- or 74% -- said the codes are used today primarily for education and that they want the codes to be strengthened so that they can be better used for that purpose. Almost four-fifths, or 79%, said that they strongly agreed that the purpose of the codes going forward should be to "aid the public in sorting plastics that can and cannot be recycled in their local program."

Another 53% said they strongly agreed that the codes should used to identify plastic materials "with like compositions that could be potentially recycled if a market were to develop," and 47% said they strongly agreed that the codes should be used to aid MRFs in processing recycled plastics.

Almost three-fifths of those surveyed, or 57%, said a code should be added for compostable plastics, and 40% said that the chasing arrows should be removed, with others suggesting that the recycling arrows only be used on items that can be recycled.

One-third recommended that a code be added for the type of molding method used to make the plastic, while others said that the code numbers themselves should be larger, and when that when products made from the same resin can´t be recycled, they should have a different number.

An ASTM subcommittee is scheduled to vote on a number of proposals at its next meeting in April, including whether to give linear low density polyethylene and polylactic acid their own numbers when the code is eventually revised, possibly later this year.

About one-fifth, or 18%, said that they don´t use the codes at all. The two top reasons given by more than 60% of those respondents:

  • The codes "cause confusion ... and complicate our outreach education" about what is and is not accepted for recycling.
  • They "do not adequately distinguish" between items accepted and not accepted for recycling.

More than three-quarters of those surveyed -- or 77% -- said that they get phone calls and emails from people saying they don´t understand the codes. Even more, 88%, said the general public has told them that they don´t understand why municipalities can´t accept all plastics.

What types of plastics are collected varies greatly from city to state, the survey found.

Roughly 30% said that they collect all plastic bottles and containers with resin codes 1-7. The next highest number, 27%, said that they only collect PET and HDPE bottles.

Twelve percent only collect plastic bottles, but of all resin types, and 14% said they only collect PET and HDPE bottles and containers.

The survey estimates that 92% accept PET and HDPE bottles for recycling, 50% accept HDPE bottles and containers and 49% accept PET bottles and containers.

More than 40% exclude some or all plastic products in resin classifications: 3-7, that is PVC, LDPE, polypropylene, polystyrene, and products that fall into the "other" category.

Less than 10% said they had composting programs and that "few" compostable bags -- with the exception of kitchen bags -- are accepted "due to confusion."

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KAB's Great American Clean Up 2011 Launched

Keep America Beautiful's Great American Cleanup, the nation's largest community improvement program, takes place annually from March 1 through May 31. Through the organization's network of affiliates, an estimated 3 million volunteers and attendees will work towards cleaning up their communities.

The hardworking volunteers donated more than 5.7 million hours in 2010 to clean, beautify and improve more than 33,000 communities during more than 30,000 events in all 50 states and beyond. Activities included beautifying parks and recreation areas, cleaning seashores and waterways, handling recycling collections, picking up litter, planting trees and flowers, and conducting educational programs and litter-free events. 

Last year, volunteers in 33,700 communities collected 76 million pounds of debris, including recyclables such as used electronics, metals, glass and scrap tires.

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Waste Management Receives Ethical Company Award

From Waste & Recycilng News - Waste Management Inc. is being recognized by the Ethisphere Institute as one of the world´s most ethical companies for the fourth year in a row. Out of a record number of nominations for the award, WM secured a spot on the list as the only environmental services company recognized for going the extra mile and implementing upright business practices and initiatives that are instrumental to the company’s success, benefit the community and raise the bar for ethical standards within the industry.

"WM places a strong value on corporate responsibility, and being named to Ethisphere´s 2011 World´s Most Ethical Companies list is a testament to the solid foundation we have in place," CEO David Steiner said. "Having this distinction helps to elevate our position as an industry leader and employer of choice. We are committed to sharing an unwavering dedication to the highest ethical standards from employees at every level of our organization."

Ethisphere reviewed thousands of companies before naming 110 companies to the list, which includes firms from 38 industries.

Other winners this year include American Express, eBay, Ford Motor Company, Adidas, Starbucks, PepsiCo and Xerox Corp, Waste Management said.

"As companies strive to maintain a competitive advantage, good ethics translate into better business, and better business means better bottom lines. Waste Management recognizes the important role that principled practices play in brand reputation, which ultimately is the most valuable asset for a corporation," said Alex Brigham, executive director of the Ethisphere Institute.

Ethisphere calls itself a "think-tank dedicated to the creation, advancement and sharing of best practices in business ethics, corporate social responsibility, anti-corruption and sustainability."

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Recycle Runway Unveiling Atlanta Airport Display

Recycle Runway is a project created by artist and educator Nancy Judd. Judd creates couture fashion from trash as an innovative way to provide education about conservation. The organization is on the move these days, and the next stop is the Atlanta International Airport— yes, since 1998 Atlanta has been reported as the busiest airport in the world based on number of passengers!

In April Nancy Judd will install 18 of her recycled fashion designs in nine cases throughout International Concourse E. To access Concourse E take the “Plane Train” (AKA the Concourse Shuttle) or just walk from any one of the concourses or the main terminal. (Note to Atlanta residents: Concourse E is on the secure side of the airport, so you will need a ticket to get there.)

The exhibition will be on display for one year and the airport estimates that it will be seen by 10-13 million people! Nancy’s exhibitions use glamorous trash fashions to encourage people in a fun and creative context to live lighter on the earth.

Read more…

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Recycling Brochure Available Online

caminoreal

Download NMRC's new Recycling Brochure with general information on how and why to recycle in New Mexico at Recycling Brochure

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Recycling Commodity Prices

Demand for OCC has softened in our area, resulting in a price drop of at least $10 per Ton in April. Price for ONP remains the same, while price for SOP keeps going up as in the last couple months. No big changes on the price for plastics No 1 & No 2 and LDPE/Shrink Wrap.

Please note that the following prices reflect what recyclers in our region are paying for recyclable materials. Prices may differ due to presentation, transportation costs, or the amounts of materials being picked-up or delivered. The higher price usually applies to full or partial loads of baled material which require no further processing or reloading. These prices are good for the month of April.

Date Card-board News-paper Sorted Office Paper Mixed Paper Shrink Wrap PET Bottles #1* Natural HDPE Mixed Color HDPE Alumin-um Cans
April 2011 $60-$135/ton $45-$100/ton $50-$200/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.06-$0.24/lb $0.06-$0.31/lb $0.02-$0.18/lb $0.62-$0.72/lb
March 2011 $65-$145/ton $45-$100/ton $50-$180/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.06-$0.24/lb $0.06-$0.31/lb $0.02-$0.18/lb $0.58-$0.68/lb
Feb 2011 $65-$145/ton $45-$95/ton $50-$180/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.04-$0.22/lb $0.04-$0.30/lb $0.02-$0.18/lb $0.58-$0.67/lb
Dec 2010 $75-$160/ton $30-$80/ton $50-$165/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.10/lb $0.04-$0.18/lb $0.04-$0.26/lb $0.02-$0.18/lb $0.58-$0.67/lb
Nov 2010 $75-$160/ton $10-$60/ton $50-$165/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.10/lb $0.03-$0.16/lb* $0.03-$0.24/lb $0.01-$0.17/lb $0.56-$0.65/lb
Sept 2010 $75-$140/ton $10-$60/ton $50-$165/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.10/lb $0.03-$0.16/lb* $0.03-$0.24/lb $0.01-$0.17/lb 0.51-$0.58/lb

August 2010

$75-$140/ton $10-$60/ton $50-$170/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.03-$0.16/lb* $0.03-$0.23/lb $0.01-$0.18/lb 0.51-$0.56/lb
June 2010 $75-$140/ton $10-$65/ton $50-$145/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.03-$0.15/lb* $0.03-$0.22/lb $0.01-$0.17/lb 0.49-$0.52/lb
May 2010 $75-$145/ton $10-$70/ton $50-$145/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.03-$0.18/lb* $0.03-$0.31/lb $0.01-$0.20/lb 0.54-$0.64/lb

April 2010

$85-$150/ton $10- $70/ton $50- $150/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.03-$0.20/lb* $0.03-$0.29/lb $0.01-$0.20/lb 0.54-$0.66/lb
Feb 2010 $85-$145/ton $10-$65/ton $50-$160/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.02-$0.04/lb* $0.03-$0.26/lb $0.01-$0.13/lb 0.52-$0.54/lb
Jan 2010 $75-$115/ton $10-$65/ton $35-$150/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.02-$0.04/lb* $0.03-$0.26/lb $0.01-$0.11/lb 0.48-$0.58/lb
Dec. 2009 $50-$85/ton $10-$65/ton $30-$130/ton NA $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.02-$0.04/lb* $0.03-$0.26/lb $0.01-$0.11/lb $0.48-$0.58/lb
Nov. 2009

$40-$75/ton

$10-$65/ton $30-$120/ton NA $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.02-$0.04/lb* $0.03-$0.26/lb $0.01-$0.11/lb $0.48-$0.58/lb
Oct. 2009 $40-75/ton $10-65/ton $30-110/ton NA $.02-.06/lb $.02-.04/lb* $.03-.26/lb $.01-.11/lb $.48-.58/lb
Sept 2009 $40-80/ton $10-55/ton $30-100/ton NA $.02-.05/lb $.02-.03/lb* $.03-$.17/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.40-$.54/lb
Aug 2009 $40-80/ton $10-50/ton $30-95/ton NA $.02-.04/lb $.02/lb* $.03-$.15/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.38-$.52/lb
July 2009 $40-75/ton $10-50/ton $25-90/ton NA $.02-.035/lb $.01/lb* $.03-$.15/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.34-$.50/lb
June 2009 $25-55/ton $10-45/ton $30-70/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $.005/lb* $.03-$.15/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.32-$.44/lb
May 2009 $10-45/ton $10-35/ton $30-60/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $.005/lb* $.03-$.15/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.32-$.44/lb
April 2009 $10-45/ton $10-35/ton $30-65/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $.005/lb* $.03-$.12/lb $.01-$.06/lb $.28-$.37/lb
March 2009 $10-50/ton $5-35/ton $30-70/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $.005/lb* $.03-$.10/lb $.01-$.05/lb $.18-$.37/lb
Feb 2009 $5-40/ton $5-30/ton $30-70/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $0 $.03-$.10/lb $.01-$.05/lb $.30-$.36/lb
Jan 2009 $5-35/ton $5-40/ton $30-70/ton NA $.01-.04/lb $0 $.03-$.04/lb $.01-$.03/lb $.30-$.40/lb
Dec 2008 $5-45/ton $5-40/ton $30-80/ton NA $.01-.04/lb $0 $.02-$.04/lb $.01-$.03/lb $.18-$.32/lb
Nov 2008 $20-60/ton $5-50/ton $40-105/ton NA $.04-.09/lb $.005/lb $.02-$.04/lb $.01-$.03/lb $.18-$.22/lb
Oct 2008 $55-90/ton $35-80/ton $45-155/ton $5-10/ton $.05-.10/lb $.03-.10/lb $.03-$.06/lb $.03-$.06/lb $.48-$.60/lb
Sept 2008 $65-105/ton $45-95/ton $45-165/ton $5-50/ton $.05-.10/lb $.03-.10/lb $.03-$.06/lb $.03-$.06/lb $.48-$.75/lb

 

* Only accepting 100 pounds plus of PET #1

 

Please note that this is a sample of what is being offered in New Mexico for certain commodities. Purchase prices for OCC and Paper are subject to change based on market fluctuations as reflected in the Southwest Region of the Official Board Markets’ Yellow Sheet. Prices vary according to presentation and quantity. These prices are for partial loads. Full truckloads of any of the materials would be paid at a greater price depending on the pick-up location and destination of the material.

 

Other resources:

http://www.amm.com/recman/recdata/reccomp.htm for national average commodity prices

http://www.wastenews.com/secondaryfiber/  

http://www.packaging-online.com/

 

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Recycling Scraps Sponsored By Dex

 

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Welcome to New Members 2011

Sean Gillespie, GreenPaso Services; Gordon West, Santa Clara Woodworks; Recycle Cibola!; Brian Gutierrez, Mr. G's Recycling

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Regional Round Up

Albuquerque - Third Annual Open Space Recycled Art Fair to celebrate Open Space's Spring Clean-ups in the foothils willl take place April 16 & 17 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm at the Open Space Visitors Center (6500 Coors Blvd NW at the end of Bosque Meadows Rd.
between Montaño and Paseo del Norte). For more information contact Kim Selving at kselving@cabq.gov or 505-897-8831. www.cabq.gov/openspace/visitorcenter.html

Rio Rancho - Keep Rio Rancho Beautiful (KRRB) is seeking volunteers to help with its Great American Cleanup. on April 23rd. To register your group or family in this year’s Great American Cleanup*, call KRRB at 891-5015 by April 18. Trash bags, gloves, t-shirts, water bottles and program banners will be available for litter cleanups. 

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Grants, Loans and Jobs

 

State Loans

NMED Constructions Programs Bureau offers low-interest loans for solid waste projects: http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/cpb/rip.html

NMED Solid Waste Bureau's Recycling and Illegal Dumping Grant open until April 8th: http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/SWB/

Jobs

Bio-Pappel (Formerly Durango McKinley Paper Co.) is hiring both Plant Manager & Recycling Coordinator at its Colorado Springs, CO facility. To learn more or apply, please email Frank Sanchez at fsanchez@biopappel.com

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Recycling Tidbits

U.S. Film and Bag Recycling Rate Increases Slowly at 2.64%
Plastic bag and film recycling is still increasing, but very slowly.   More»

EPA Grants Available for Environmental Education
From Resource Recycling - Know of an organization that operates an environmental education project, or have one yourself? The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is gearing up for its latest round of grant funding to support such endeavors.  More>>

MIT Tracks Trash for Study
From Resource Recycling - Out of sight, out of mind has long been the mindset of many when taking out the trash. But a new project from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology seeks to illuminate what happens where disposals after being disposed.More>>

Europe Exceeds PVC Recycling Targets for 2010
More than a quarter of a million metric tons of post-consumer PVC was recycled in Europe last year through Recovinyl, the PVC industry’s recycling initiative -- comfortably exceeding its 240,000 metric tons target by the end of 2010.   More»

Wal-mart Diverts 80% of Waste from Landfills in California
Retail giant Wal-mart said it has diverted 80% of its waste from landfills at its California operations.   More»

AF&PA to Recover 70% of All Paper Consumed in U.S.
A trade group representing the forest products industry is out with a new goal to recycle America´s paper.   More»

Groups Protest Wis. Governor's Plan to Cut Recycling
From Resource Recycling - The ongoing battle over funding for Wisconsin's recycling programs continues to unfold. Last week more than 150 municipalities, businesses and other organizations sent a letter to state legislators and the governor opposing the proposed state budget that would eliminate funds to help local governments maintain recycling programs. Members of the governor's party are also continuing to push for alternatives. More>>

CalRecycle Plans Series of Rubberized Asphalt Workshops
The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, better known as CalRecycle, is planning a series of five half-day workshops this spring to disseminate information about rubberized asphalt paving materials and tire-derived aggregate for civil engineering projects.   More»

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Calendar

The NMRC board meets 5 times a year and members are always welcome to attend the meetings. We welcome your input and are always looking for new board members for our September election. We have also started offering a call-in option to board meetings. If you wish to attend any of the meetings, please RSVP ahead of time to english@recyclenewmexico.com.

  • May 12, 9 AM - 1 PM: NMRC Board Meeting, Los Alamos.

  • June 9, 9 AM - 4 PM: Free Recycling Workshop - Hub & Spoke Recycling: The Next Generation, Albuquerque
  • June 9, 6 PM - 9PM: NMRC 20th Anniversary Coming of Age Celebration, Albuquerque
  • September 14, 9 AM - 1 PM: NMRC Board Meeting, Moriarty.

  • November 3-4, 11:30 AM start on the 3rd, ending 1 PM on the 4th: NMRC Board Retreat, Sevilleta.

All these meetings are posted online at www.recyclenewmexico.com/calendar.htm

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2011 Recycling and Composting Facility Operator Certification

 

Certification Course

Date

Location

Compost Facility Operator

April 12-14

Ruidoso

October 4-6

Albuquerque

Recycling Facility Operator'

May 17-19

Ruidoso

Dec 6-8

Santa Fe

 

Recycling Facility Operators Certification Courses

May 17-19, Ruidoso register

Held at Eastern NM University with a tour of Greentree Recycling Center.

 

*December 6-8, Santa Fe register   Held at the Genoveva Chavez Community Center with a tour of the Buckman Road Recycling and Transfer Station

 

Compost Facility Operators Certification Courses

April 12-14, Ruidoso register  

Held at Eastern NM University with a tour of BioGrind facility.

 

*October 4-6, Albuquerque register  

Held at the Fire Academy with a tour of Soilutions & the Soil Amendment Facility.

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If you have questions about any of the above information or have articles for future Recycling Scraps, please e-mail or call

English Bird, Executive Director

New Mexico Recycling Coalition

PO Box 24364, Santa Fe, NM 87502

english@recyclenewmexico.com

(505) 983-4470 

 
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