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Recycling Scraps
July 5, 2011

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NMRC Announces the 2011 Recycling Awards

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(left photo) Marlene Feuer, Accepting the E. Gifford Stack Lifetime Achievement Award Winner &
(right photo) Patrick Peck, Accepting the Recycler of the Year Award

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(left photo) Brandon Gutierrez, Accepting the Community Recycler of the Year Award for the Town of Taos &
(right photo) Kevin Roessler, Accepting the Business Recycler of the Year Award for Savoy Bar & Grill

New Mexico Recycling Coalition (NMRC) is pleased to announce the 2011 Recycler of the Year, Business Recycler of the Year, Community Recycler of the Year and the Lifetime Achievement Award.  Since 2002 NMRC has recognized individuals, businesses and communities that work to reduce waste and support recycling and composting in New Mexico.   2011 Award Winners include:

  • Patrick Peck, Director of South Central Solid Waste Authority in Las Cruces, Recycler of the Year
  • Town of Taos, Community Recycler of the Year
  • Savoy Bar & Grill in Albuquerque, Business Recycler of the Year
  • Marlene Feuer, Government & Public Affairs Manager, Waste Management, E. Gifford Stack Lifetime Achievement Award

English Bird, Executive Director of New Mexico Recycling Coalition, notes, "Everyone can recycle on a daily basis.  Recycling not only provides a means to conserve resources and create jobs, but also provides a quality of life service. NMRC is proud to honor these recycling pioneers, who are leading the way to provide their communities the opportunity to recycle.”

Patrick Peck, Director of the South Central Solid Waste Authority (SCSWA) in Las Cruces is awarded the 2011 Recycler of the Year Award for his successful efforts to bring curbside recycling to Las Cruces and expand recycling in Las Cruces and Dona Ana County.  Recycling collection and drop-off is available at more than 20 schools in Las Cruces, 8 Community Collection Centers in Dona Ana County, and the Authority collects from 250 area businesses. Today, SCSWA sees an average of 850 tons monthly of recyclable material run through their programs.

The Town of Taos Recycling Center has operated for the past 12 years and provided the mountain community with a comprehensive drop-off recycling center used by their 5,500 town residents, as well as residents from the entire region of 32,000.  Processing cardboard, mixed paper, plastic 1 & 2, glass, steel and tin cans, along with electronic scrap, white goods, carpet padding, pallets, CFLs and of course the famous Taos Free Box, the program has been able to not only cover its costs, but also put revenue away for further investment into the infrastructure and program.  Taos processed more than 1,300 tons of recyclable materials (which doesn't include the organic and scrap metals diverted at the Taos regional landfill) in 2010. 

Savoy Bar and Grill’s Executive Chef Bob Peterson has designed and implemented a full-scale recycling program (inclusive of glass, cardboard and food waste) at this progressive dining establishment located in Albuquerque's Foothills neighborhood.   In 2010, Savoy Bar and Grill recycled 28 tons of food-waste...and they are well on their way to reaching higher goals in 2011.

Marlene Feuer, Government & Public Affairs Manager at Waste Management, has worked in the solid waste industry for 30 plus years and has become a self-admitted "recycler at heart". NMRC is honored to recognize her with the E. Gifford Stack Lifetime Achievement Award this year.  Professionally, she has worked to bring recycling services around the state, working directly with communities such as Ranchos de Albuquerque, the Town of Bernalillo, Bernalillo County, Farmington, Hobbs, Rio Rancho and several subdivisions to ensure they receive full-service curbside and drop-off recycling collection services. She served as a NMRC board member for as many terms as allowed - 6 years from 2002-2008!

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Thank you for making the June 9th Recycling Training a Success!- Hub & Spoke Recycling: The Next Generation

Nearly 100 individuals representing municipalities large and small, businesses, tribes, citizen groups, non-profits, recycling end markets and state government attended the Hub & Spoke Recycling: The Next Generation held on June 9th at UNM. Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedules to attend.

If you attended the training and haven't already taken the evaluation survey, please take the short survey regarding the overall June 9th NM Recycling Training by following this link to Survey Monkey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/XYY9BT2. Survey results really help NMRC know what did and didn't work well and how to improve future trainings.

The training focused on Pay -As-You-Throw, NMRC's Rural Recycling Resources (R3) Cooperative and theafternoon sessions included "Getting Quality Material From the Public", "Setting Up Household Hazardous Waste Collection" and "Launching a ReUse Collection Program". All presentations are posted online at http://www.recyclenewmexico.com/recyclingtraining2011.htm

The training was funded through a Department of Energy American Recovery and Reinvestment Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant.

Thank you to Whole Foods Market for donating snacks and drinks for the training.

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NMRC Celebrated Its 20th Anniversary on June 9th

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Approximately 70 founders, past and current Board Members & staff, friends and members joined together on June 9th to remember the beginnings of the New Mexico Recycling Coalition (NMRC) and the organization's accomplishments within its first 20 years.  Accomplishments within the past 20 years include: membership growth from less than 50 to over 260 municipalities, tribes, businesses, state and federal government entities, non-profits and individuals; creation of November’s NM Recycling Awareness Month; support of NM’s Solid Waste Act; securing of federal funding to promote and develop rural recycling; creation of a comprehensive Buy Recycled Guide; hosting national NRC and Biocycle conference; outreach throughout the state to provide technical recycling assistance; staff growth from zero to four employees; development of the NM Recycling Conference and more!  Thank you to all that attended and to those that didn't attend, but sent their best wishes!

 

Thank you to our generous premier event sponsors:

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Rural Recycling Project Update

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Through this summer, the three funded recycling center hubs in Deming, Otero County and Torrance County will be putting into place the recycling processing infrastructure and receiving horizontal balers and collection equipment. All of the recycling centers should be up and running by September. Each community's launch will be coupled with a large-scale education campaign.

NMRC is also assisting the 3 recycling hubs funded through NMED stimulus funds in Raton, Truth or Consequences and Gallup. The first horizontal baler will be installed in T or C on July 13th, with installations of equipment at the other two facilities expected by end of summer.

Spoke collection equipment that went to NMRC-funded communities of Maxwell, Springer, Cibola County, Otero County, Deming, San Miguel County and Cimarron should be in place by August. In total, with all hub and spoke award monies, we will see at least 35 new drop-off locations for recycling in New Mexico!

The cooperative marketing entity called R3 (Rural Recycling Resources) that is hosted by NMRC will launch in September, just in time to assist these new hubs in their material marketing. NMRC has reached out to all recycling processing facilities in the state and looks forward to assisting existing hubs and processors with marketing of their materials as well.

Another aspect of this project is outreach and assistance on the adoption of Pay-As-You-Throw (PAYT). This model is based on the concept of other utility billing practices, such as water and electricity, where one pays for what they use. PAYT communities find they are able to cover their solid waste costs, see an overall reduction in solid waste generation and an increase in their diversion. The topic was introduced at the recent June 9th NM Recycling Workshop and will follow-up with direct outreach to eligible communities and several webinars. Look for more information soon on this project!

NMRC has been honored with invitations to present the hub and spoke recycling model being implemented here in New Mexico to several national solid waste and recycling conferences in August: SWANA's WasteCon conference in Nashville on August 23, Resource Recycling's Conference in Indianapolis on August 17 and the Association of State and Territorial Solid Waste Management Officials (ASTSWMO) in Kansas City on August 10th. NMRC also recently presented the model at Colorado's state recycling conference and will share information on the project at the NM Municipal League's conference in Roswell on August 31st in partnership with Waste Management.

Through these three federal money grant sources, we expect to see a radical shift in recycling processing capacity, access to recycling and a general increase in recycling throughout the state. The majority of these funded communities had not been able to offer traditional recyclable collection and processing before these grant funds arrived. All communities listed will soon be able to accept cardboard, mixed paper, plastic #1 & 2 bottles, aluminum and steel cans for recycling.

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Bulb Eater Saves Thousands for Los Alamos National Lab

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From The Los Alamos Monitor - The Los Alamos National Laboratory this month expanded the use of a fluorescent bulb-crushing machine to handle waste bulbs Labwide. Itís a move that could save tens of thousands of dollars in waste disposal fees and will prevent mercury from escaping into the environment.

The device is called a Bulb Eater. It attaches to the top of a 55-gallon drum and works like a large food processor.  Workers load fluorescent bulbs into a tube, which then sucks them through a propeller-like set of blades, pulverizing the bulbs.

"What you would see inside the drum is a fine glass powder and a couple of beat-up end caps. That's it," said Jim Stanton, a contractor working on the project for the Maintenance and Site Services (MSS) Division.

Fluorescent bulbs contain small amounts of mercury vapor and must be labeled, boxed, and disposed as a type of hazardous waste.

"Every box is a compliance point," Stanton said.  "In a landfill, if you get enough fluorescent bulbs you eventually get that mercury leaking into the environment."

But the Bulb Eater captures the vapor in a three-stage filtering process and neutralizes it by converting the vapor to mercuric sulfide, which is non-hazardous.

Stanton estimates that the device can reduce waste volumes by more than 20 times. One cardboard disposal box holds 30 bulbs, but a drum can hold more than 600 crushed bulbs.

The device has been in use at the CMR building and was used to dispose of bulbs from the SM-43 Administration Building. Starting last week, nearly every spent bulb removed from most Lab buildings will meet its fate in a Bulb Eater.

"This has been a big pollution-prevention issue," Stanton said. "It's good to see this really getting going."

Stanton also credited colleagues in the Waste and Environmental  Services, Environmental Protection, Maintenance and Site Services, and Industrial Hygiene and Safety divisions for getting the project under way.  

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Las Cruces Schools Approve Formal Recycling

By Suzanne Michaels for the Las Cruces Sun News - They've been recycling for almost two years, they've "beautified" their bright blue bins, created "green teams," hosted recycle rallies, and engaged students, teachers and staff in recycling, but now Las Cruces Public Schools has a formal recycling policy in place.

"We're excited! Although everyone has embraced recycling, in an organization this big, it's important to formalize the process," said Herb Torres, associate superintendent for Operations of Las Cruces Public Schools. The school board adopted the new policy the third week of April, to not only promote recycling, but also reduce waste reduction.

More than 20 schools in the district are already up and running with recycling capabilities. With only 18 schools to go, that means Las Cruces Public Schools is more than half way to being completely recycling-friendly.

Las Cruces Public Schools encompasses 25,000 students and almost 4,000 faculty and staff, who have been very supportive of recycling. Now that the recycling policy is official, almost one third of the Las Cruces total population will be encouraged to recycle on a daily basis, at school.

Picacho Middle School embraced recycling at the beginning. As the first middle school to start recycling in Las Cruces, Picacho earned the title of the second to recycle the most in the district, nipping on the heels of Mesilla Park Elementary.

With recycle rallies kicking-off the school year, large loads of recyclables each week, and now with the recycling policy in place, Picacho Middle School is stepping up its game.

Picacho Principal Michael Montoya is proud that his staff adopted recycling immediately. "By the time we started urging students to get involved... all teachers and supporting staff were already on board with recycling," Montoya said.

Just like the rest of us, the easier you make it for students to recycle, the more engaged they are... "We found that as long as the recycling bins are convenient to the students... they are wonderful participants in the recycling process," Montoya said.

Some of the stipulations in the LCPS recycling policy include:
-- The school district will attempt whenever possible to decrease the amount of waste-consumable materials it uses.
-- When purchasing a product, consideration will be given not only to the product's purchase price, but also the product's life-cycle cost and its recycle-disposal cost.
-- Each school district facility shall have all necessary recyclable containers for appropriate collection.
-- The school district shall cooperate with and participate in, recycling programs initiated by the city and/or county where the school district is located.

Torres states, "The LCPS district wants to be eco-friendly, and we want to be a recycling partner in Las Cruces."

So far, that very last part has already been put in motion. Las Cruces Public Schools has coordinated efforts with the South Central Solid Waste Authority and the city to bring recycling into the schools.
For more information, the official waste reduction and recycling policy will soon be available at the Las Cruces Public Schools official website.

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Valencia County Volunteers Clean up Over 427,000 Pounds of Dumped Trash

Things are a little cleaner in Valencia County. That's the good news county environmental coordinator Angel Martinez delivered to county commissioners a few weeks ago. With 516 adult and youth volunteers, about 427,000 pounds of illegally dumped trash was removed from areas around the county.

All this was accomplished thanks to the $21,000 Keep American Beautiful grant the county took over last year from the nonprofit group Tierra Bonita. Martinez said the clean-up efforts and grant funding are being incorporated into the environmental health department the county is building.

New Mexico Clean and Beautiful is an affiliate of Keep America Beautiful, the largest and one of the oldest volunteer based organizations in the country, Martinez said. The grant was matched with in-kind donations of about $4,000, he said and the county awarded 13 youth grants for $426.57 each and two adult grants of $800 apiece.

Martinez said the program spent $8,451 on 30-yard dumpsters, and adult volunteers picked up more than 240,000 pounds of trash. The rest of the funding went to education efforts, beautification, recycling and graffiti removal, he said.

"Next year, we have seven distinct and old illegal dumping sites we want to tackle," Martinez said. "This year we made one area our priority. About 200 yards behind the Conejo Transfer Station was one of the county's largest illegal dumping grounds. We targeted the area by Conejo because it just seemed ridiculous for us to have an illegal dump site just yards behind the permitted, legal dump site."

On Earth Day, Martinez and county environmental staff went to the Adelino Early Childhood Development Center, where 250 participants re-purposed old tractor tires for planters.

The children at the center, along with their parents, painted the tires white then decorated them with their own handprints.

"We have to change the minds of the younger generation. They will be the ones to take over," Martinez said. "They helped in the rehabilitation of their own facility and we talked about the 'yuckiness' of illegal dumping, planted 118 flowers, 200 bulbs and six rose bushes. We helped them take an interest in their community, a sense of pride in their surroundings."

In preparation for Earth Day, county volunteers cleaned part of N.M. 47 behind Tomeacute Hill, Martinez said. "So it's our own people who are getting involved too," he said.

About 80 adult volunteers did seven major clean-ups over the last 12 months and removed 240,000 pounds of trash and 1,500 pounds of recyclable metal. Martinez said his department is working with county code enforcement officers.

"When they go in front of a judge and are asked how much of a fine should be imposed, they tell the judge they want the dumping cleaned up," Martinez said. "The person always participates in the clean-ups. We don't want to create an enabler relationship where someone throws it out and we clean it up."

Commission Chairwoman Georgia Otero-Kirkham thanked Martinez and all the volunteers for their efforts.

"We can't do enough," Otero-Kirkham said. "Thank you."

The groups and individuals specifically thanked by Martinez and his staff for consistently volunteering were: the Rio Communities Association, Josie and James Maag, Tierra Grande Improvement Association, Adelino Early Childhood Development Center, and Yucca Little League Blue Jays.

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Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque Goes Green, Saving 2,786 Trees & Counting

In November 2010, CNM super-sized its recycling efforts when it signed a contract with Waste Management of New Mexico,, which led to the landing of dumpsters on all CNM campuses that collect nothing but recycled materials. The new contract also expanded the materials that could be recycled at CNM to include all fiber-based materials – from cardboard to posters to phone books to magazines and everything in between. The contract with Waste Management also includes the recycling of metal, plastics and aluminum.

In less than a year, the results are already supremely green. So far, the new recycling program has led to 232 tons of cardboard and paper, 11 tons of metal, 11 tons of plastic and five tons of aluminum being recycled.

If those numbers are a little hard to weigh in your mind, there's a more earthy way to look at the results. The recycling of these materials at CNM reduces the need to manufacture new products from natural resources. Waste Management of New Mexico estimates that CNM's recycling efforts to date will save the following resources that are needed in the manufacturing of new products:

  • 2,786 mature trees, an amount of timber that would produce 34.5 million sheets of newspaper
  • 1.625 million gallons of water, enough fresh water to meet the daily fresh water needs of more than 21,667 people
  • 558 barrels of oil, which provides enough energy to heat and cool at least 116 homes for a year
  • 937 cubic yards of landfill space, which represents enough space to fulfill municipal waste disposal needs for 1,202 people for a year
  • .95 million kilowatt hours of electricity, which is enough power to meet the annual electricity needs of at least 115 homes.

When CNM signed the contract with Waste Management, one requirement was to divert 20 percent of CNM's waste from landfills. CNM has far exceeded that number to date, diverting 47 percent of its waste from landfills and into recycling processes.

CNM's Operations personnel collect recyclables from bins across all of the campuses and transport the materials to the dumpsters daily.

This new program has also saved CNM money. Prior to the Waste Management contract, CNM's dumpsters were regularly emptied by waste collectors on specific days, regardless of whether the dumpsters were nearly full. Under the new contract, the dumpsters are emptied only when they're nearly full, saving money on the number of pickups.

 

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Farmington Recycling Plans Updated: Waste Management To Build Proposed Recycling Center

From Farmington Daily Times -- We all know the importance of recycling, but what if there's no easy way to reduce, reuse or recycle? Residents in and around Farmington soon may see a light at the end of their recycling tunnel.

Waste Management, a company generally known for garbage disposal, was given the green light at a recent City Council meeting to take over construction of a recycling center, where materials from the city's green households will be broken down and recycled.

The proposed facility will be built at the San Juan County Landfill.

It's not that people around here don't like to recycle. It's just not as convenient or practical as most would like. City officials hope that will change.

Since the start of curbside recycling two years ago, more than 6,200 households have gotten on board, beating the national average. That's close to 50 percent of the population of the area participating, something Waste Management and the city of Farmington would like to see continue to increase.

It's as simple and supply and demand. Households aren't the only ones begging for a recycling center; businesses are too.

Soon, all across the area, businesses will see copy paper, phonebooks, cardboard boxes and other everyday office supplies being broken down and turned into other products for everyday use, all in the name of going green.

The biggest sigh of relief residents can take comes after the agreement made between the city and Waste Management. Footing the bill for the construction costs of the new center now lies in the hands of Waste Management, not the citizens of Farmington.

Costs originally factored a 30-year loan, with principal and interest accruing, totaling nearly $7.5 million. Now, the city only will be held responsible for close to $2.5 million, a figure most members of the city council agreed is more manageable and better for the citizens of Farmington.

Start paying attention to the tiny triangle of arrows on the bottom of your plastic bottles, cereal boxes and aluminum cans. These items soon will have a new place to be taken and you'll have a renewed sense of being environmentally aware.

Not much has changed since being taught how to reduce, reuse, recycle. Please do your part. It's available now, and soon, it will become even easier.

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Resource Recycling Conference

August 17-18, 2011 at the JW Marriott in Indianapolis, Indiana

NMRC's English Bird will be presenting on Hub & Spoke Recycling at the conference. Click here for more information. After providing conference attendeees with a sneak peek last year, English Bird of the New Mexico Recycling Coalition will describe how a large hub-and-spoke collection and processing system is being established in that state. She will describe the system's design, implementation and equipment used to maximize effectiveness, optimize staff time, streamline transportation and bring positive cash flow to smaller, rural programs. Rachel Perry of Cooperative Teamwork and Recycling Assistance will expand on this rural recycling theme by describing how CTRA has crafted tailor-fit programs for Texas communities plagued by limited resources and distance from markets. Stephen Saulnier of the USDA Office of Rural Development has been invited to offer a perspective from the Solid Waste Management grant program.

Additionally, Alan Hale of Logan County, Ohio, which has a population of 47,000 will show how the county’s fully integrated, rural recycling program, with 14 recycling centers, feeds a new central MRF.  Alan will share a compelling story of how strategic application of a USDA rural development grant and some serious innovation has helped this rural community reach a stunning recycling rate in only four years.

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Sign Up Now for the 2011 Recycling and Composting Facility Operator Certification Courses

The NMRC and the New Mexico State Environment Department: Solid Waste Bureau will host two recycling courses and two composting courses in 2011. These courses provide an in-depth look at the science, safety, administration and operations of both recycling and composting operations.

Recycling Facility Operators Certification Courses

*December 6-8, Santa Fe register   Held at the Genoveva Chavez Community Center with a tour of the Buckman Road Recycling and Transfer Station

 

Compost Facility Operators Certification Courses

*October 4-6, Albuquerque register  

Held at the Fire Academy with a tour of Soilutions & the Soil Amendment Facility.

Our maximum class size is 35 students so please remember to register as early as possible to be assured a seat in the course.


Learn more and sign up today at http://www.recyclenewmexico.com/cert_classes.htm

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Keep America Beautiful Tries to Grab a New Generation

The organization Keep America Beautiful has launched a new attention-getting litter prevention campaign aimed at young adults.

Littering is Wrong Too utilizes social media, events and viral marketing to engage young adults regarding the litter problem, the Stamford, Conn.-based organization said.

"Not since the iconic Iron Eyes Cody public service announcement of the ´70s has KAB issued such a broad-scale national litter prevention message," said Matt McKenna, CEO of Keep America Beautiful.

The campaign targets people ages 18 to 34, a group "which KAB research pinpointed as including those most likely to litter," the group said.

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US House Bill Targets Electronic Waste Exports

From Waste & Recyling News - A bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives would create competitive research grants for reducing the environmental impact of discarded electronic devices and promote recycling of the devices through research and development projects, the bill’s author said.

Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Maryland, introduced the Electronic Device Recycling Research and Development Act, known as H.R. 2396, on June 24.

The bill authorizes the U.S. EPA to award grants to reduce the environmental impact of discarded electronics devices and calls for a study to the barriers of recycling e-waste.

"Recycling electronic waste is a win-win for our economy and our environment," Sarbanes said in a statement. "It reduces the environmental impact of high-tech manufacturing, reduces cost and makes U.S. companies less dependent on foreign suppliers of minerals and other materials."

The bill has been referred to the committee on science, space and technology.

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Second E-Waste Bill in House Would Crack Down on Exports

A bill that would restrict the export of certain electronic waste was reintroduced in the House of Representatives June 22 by Rep. Gene Green, D-Texas, and Rep. Mike Thompson, D-California.

The bill, called the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act, would establish a new category of restricted electronic waste that could not be exported to developing nations. Used equipment could still be exported for reuse as long as it has been tested and is fully functional. Non-hazardous parts or materials would not be restricted under the bill.

Similar measures were introduced in 2009 and 2010; both were referred to the committee on energy and commerce. Neither bill advanced past the committee.

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Study: Consumers Will Spend More on Green Products

From Waste & Recycling News -- Throughout the world, more consumers are seeking out greener products, according to the annual ImagePower Global Green Brands Study.

The survey, which polled 9,000 people in eight countries, shows that consumers across the globe intend to purchase more environmental products in the auto, energy and technology sectors compared to the prior year.

More than 60% of consumers globally want to buy from environmentally responsible companies, which is consistent with last year’s study. In all eight countries, those surveyed said they are willing to spend more on green products. In developed countries, such as the U.S. and the United Kingdom, roughly 20% of those surveyed said they would spend more than 10% extra on a green product.

"We´re seeing a shift in the ´In Me, On Me, Around Me´ mentality when it comes to purchasing green products," said Russ Meyer, Chief Strategy Officer of San Francisco-based marketing firm Landor Associates, in a statement. "Consumers have a good understanding of how green choices in personal care, food and household products directly affect their families, and they are now seeing benefits like costs savings that attract them to higher cost items like cars and technology."

The way products are packaged is also important to consumers, according to the study. In America, 71% believe companies use too much material in product packaging. But only 34% of U.S. consumers said they consciously purchase products that use less packaging. Almost half of American consumers felt that packaging that can be recycled is more important than packaging made from recycled or biodegradable materials.

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New Company Refills, Reuses Wine Bottles

From Earth911.com - The U.S. wine industry estimates that Americans purchase more than 300 million cases of wine annually, but what happens to all those empty wine bottles?

With the EPA-estimated national recycling rate for wine bottles at only 30 percent, a new company in northern Calif. wants to go beyond recycling and promote reuse – by washing old wine bottles and selling them back to wineries.

Opening for business in March, Wine Bottle Renew collects empty bottles from winery tasting rooms, as well as bottles that would otherwise be discarded from manufacturers, such as overstock or extra bottles. The company does not accept bottles from consumers for reuse – a common practice in many European countries.

For Wine Bottle Renew to add post-consumer wine bottles to their inventory, the national wine industry would need to standardize its bottles into a set number of types, as they do in Europe, says Bill Dodd, a partner in the company and Napa County supervisor. Though that may not happen in the near future, Dodd sees the potential for bottle standardization and reuse regionally, such as on the West Coast or in California.

While Wine Bottle Renew might not be collecting wine bottles from your curbside recycling bin any time soon, Dodd says that there is a steady supply of pre-consumer glass that the company is saving from the landfill and reusing. And the environmental benefits of reuse are impressive, according to the company’s statistics.

“Sixty percent of wine’s carbon footprint comes just from making the bottle,” he says. “We reduce [a company’s glass manufacturing carbon footprint] by 95 percent.”

It’s not just the production of the bottles that uses resources and emits pollution – it’s also the transportation of the heavy material. Bottles for California wines may travel from another state or Mexico or as far away as China, Dodd says.

Can Wine Bottle Renew compete with these manufacturers of new wine bottles? The company thinks so.

Not only are wineries interested in the green marketing edge that Renew bottles can bring, Dodd says, but the reused bottles are actually 10-40 percent cheaper than new bottles.

“It’s a win-win. Our bottles are environmentally sound and economically sound,” Dodd says.

Glass markets have not always been so amenable to bottle reuse. Back in the 1990s, a few companies attempted to get into the bottle washing business, but couldn’t compete with the low price of virgin glass at the time. The companies eventually failed, facing other challenges like a lack of technology to de-label wine bottles – problems for which Wine Bottle Renew has found solutions, the company says.

To naysayers who question the cleanliness and safety of reused bottles, the company says its bottles are as clean as new ones, after going through a series of wash and rinse cycles for sterilization – a process approved by the California Department of Health Services.

In fact, Wine Bottle Renew says its bottles are cleaner than new, since their bottles are washed immediately before shipment to a winery. It is not uncommon for new wine bottles to be stored for a some time before shipment, collecting dirt and dust, Dodd says.

And it was actually a new, but dirty bottle contaminating his homemade wine that inspired home winemaker and company founder Bruce Stevens to look for other sources of wine bottles and research the European bottle washing and refilling system.

In its fourth month of business, Wine Bottle Renew has as many as 300,000 cases of bottles at their washing facility at any time, Dodd says. The company sells reused bottles to 100 wineries and only hopes to increase its customers in the coming months.

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Aluminum Can Recycling at Highest Rate in 11 Years

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From Waste & Recycling News - The U.S. recycling rate for aluminum beverage cans has reached its highest level in a decade, with 58.1% of all cans recycled last year. The 2009 aluminum recycling rate was 57.4%.

Last year´s rate is nearly double that of any other beverage container, according to the Aluminum Association, Can Manufacturers Institute (CMI) and Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI). Nearly 56 billion aluminum cans were recycled in 2010, leading to a used beverage container recycling rate of 58.1% -- the highest in 11 years.

Because it takes 95% less energy to produce a can from recycled material, the higher recycling rate also resulted in significant energy savings, the groups reported. The amount of energy saved just from recycling cans in 2010 is equal to the energy equivalent of 17 million barrels of crude oil, or nearly two days of all U.S. oil imports.

"This is a boost for our industry and further evidence that the aluminum beverage can is the best environmental and sustainability packaging option," Steve Larkin, president of the Aluminum Association, said in a statement. "Of course we must do more at the federal, state and local levels to enact recycling policies and awareness, and this is a task we continue to pursue aggressively."

Aluminum cans represent a valuable portion of recyclable commodities, Robin Wiener, president of ISRI. The industry provided a $77 billion boost to the U.S. economy in 2010, Wiener said. The aluminum can is the most valuable package in the recycling stream and is the only packaging material that covers the cost of its own collection and re-processing.

"As the first link in the manufacturing supply chain, the scrap recycling industry provides vital feedstock material sought after by industrial customers around the world, including more than 4.6 million metric tons of aluminum scrap processed in the United States and shipped throughout the United States and more than 50 countries in 2010," Wiener said.

In 2008, the Aluminum Association adopted a goal of recycling 75% of aluminum cans by 2015. The recycling rate at that time was 54.2%, and it has been gradually climbing since then.

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Special Needs Artists Creating Giftcards out of Recycled Jeans

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Paperworks Studio, a program of Goodwill, has teamed up with Lee Jeans to release an exclusive line of Lee Jeans recycled denim greeting cards. The one-of-a-kind handmade cards will be made by an exceptional team of artists with special needs and disadvantages.  Paperworks Studio is the only company in the world that makes 100 percent recycled blue jean cards with such an inspiring team.

“This is a great day for Paperworks Studio and our talented artists,” said Margaret Alexander, Director of Paperworks Studio.  “We are so excited to have such an iconic brand like Lee Jeans help us grow. They are truly making a positive impact in the lives of hundreds of individuals who typically don’t have the opportunities that most people have.”

In addition to receiving a gaylord of denim leg panels, which will serve as the materials for the cards, each Paperworks Studio artist involved in the creative process will also receive a new pair of Lee Jeans. Learn more at www.paperworksstudio.com

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New Member Highlight: ACS Companies

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NMRC would like to welcome Action Container Solutions (ACS) Companies, which recently joined NMRC as a Silver Member. The company is based in Phoenix and manufactures waste and recycling equipment for the west coast. ACS has been providing equipment to their customers for the past 10 years.

Brian Gibson, the regional representative notes that, "Our company is very unique because it provides our customers with the ability to customize their equipment."

ACS provides scrap bins, roll-off containers and front load containers currently to the private/ municipal sector, as well as federal agencies in New Mexico. ACS has noted a large demand in the past year in New Mexico for both new and used recycling equipment. More info at www.theacscompanies.com. ACS can be reached at (602) 278-0512 or brian@acscompaction.com.

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Recycling Brochure Available Online

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Download NMRC's new Recycling Brochure with general information on how and why to recycle in New Mexico at Recycling Brochure

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Recycling Commodity Prices

Generation of OCC remains low, and demand for this material remains strong. Expect a price increase of $5 to $20 per Ton. Demand for SOP is also strong, and a price increase of $5 or $10 per Ton is expected. ONP price should hold, but there is a possibility that it may go down $5 per Ton. Plastics markets have softened lately. Price for PET and HDPE has gone down a few cents for two months in a row.

Please note that the following prices reflect what recyclers in our region are paying for recyclable materials for the month of July. Prices may differ due to presentation, transportation costs, or the amounts of materials being picked-up or delivered. The higher price usually applies to full or partial loads of baled material which require no further processing or reloading.

Date Card-board News-paper Sorted Office Paper Mixed Paper Shrink Wrap PET Bottles #1* Natural HDPE
Mixed Color HDPE
Alumin-um Cans
July 2011 $75-$165/ton $45-$90/ton $50-$230/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.05-$0.21/lb $0.06-$0.28/lb $0.02-$0.14/lb $0.65-$0.70/lb
June 2011 $65-$145/ton $45-$90/ton $50-$220/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.05-$0.23/lb $0.06-$0.31/lb $0.02-$0.16/lb $0.68-$0.75/lb
May 2011 $60-$135/ton $45-$90/ton $50-$220/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.06-$0.24/lb $0.06-$0.31/lb $0.02-$0.18/lb $0.66-$0.73/lb
April 2011 $60-$135/ton $45-$100/ton $50-$200/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.06-$0.24/lb $0.06-$0.31/lb $0.02-$0.18/lb $0.62-$0.72/lb
March 2011 $65-$145/ton $45-$100/ton $50-$180/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.06-$0.24/lb $0.06-$0.31/lb $0.02-$0.18/lb $0.58-$0.68/lb
Feb 2011 $65-$145/ton $45-$95/ton $50-$180/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.04-$0.22/lb $0.04-$0.30/lb $0.02-$0.18/lb $0.58-$0.67/lb
Dec 2010 $75-$160/ton $30-$80/ton $50-$165/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.10/lb $0.04-$0.18/lb $0.04-$0.26/lb $0.02-$0.18/lb $0.58-$0.67/lb
Nov 2010 $75-$160/ton $10-$60/ton $50-$165/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.10/lb $0.03-$0.16/lb* $0.03-$0.24/lb $0.01-$0.17/lb $0.56-$0.65/lb
Sept 2010 $75-$140/ton $10-$60/ton $50-$165/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.10/lb $0.03-$0.16/lb* $0.03-$0.24/lb $0.01-$0.17/lb 0.51-$0.58/lb

August 2010

$75-$140/ton $10-$60/ton $50-$170/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.03-$0.16/lb* $0.03-$0.23/lb $0.01-$0.18/lb 0.51-$0.56/lb
June 2010 $75-$140/ton $10-$65/ton $50-$145/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.03-$0.15/lb* $0.03-$0.22/lb $0.01-$0.17/lb 0.49-$0.52/lb
May 2010 $75-$145/ton $10-$70/ton $50-$145/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.12/lb $0.03-$0.18/lb* $0.03-$0.31/lb $0.01-$0.20/lb 0.54-$0.64/lb

April 2010

$85-$150/ton $10- $70/ton $50- $150/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.03-$0.20/lb* $0.03-$0.29/lb $0.01-$0.20/lb 0.54-$0.66/lb
Feb 2010 $85-$145/ton $10-$65/ton $50-$160/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.02-$0.04/lb* $0.03-$0.26/lb $0.01-$0.13/lb 0.52-$0.54/lb
Jan 2010 $75-$115/ton $10-$65/ton $35-$150/ton $5/ton $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.02-$0.04/lb* $0.03-$0.26/lb $0.01-$0.11/lb 0.48-$0.58/lb
Dec. 2009 $50-$85/ton $10-$65/ton $30-$130/ton NA $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.02-$0.04/lb* $0.03-$0.26/lb $0.01-$0.11/lb $0.48-$0.58/lb
Nov. 2009

$40-$75/ton

$10-$65/ton $30-$120/ton NA $0.02-$0.06/lb $0.02-$0.04/lb* $0.03-$0.26/lb $0.01-$0.11/lb $0.48-$0.58/lb
Oct. 2009 $40-75/ton $10-65/ton $30-110/ton NA $.02-.06/lb $.02-.04/lb* $.03-.26/lb $.01-.11/lb $.48-.58/lb
Sept 2009 $40-80/ton $10-55/ton $30-100/ton NA $.02-.05/lb $.02-.03/lb* $.03-$.17/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.40-$.54/lb
Aug 2009 $40-80/ton $10-50/ton $30-95/ton NA $.02-.04/lb $.02/lb* $.03-$.15/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.38-$.52/lb
July 2009 $40-75/ton $10-50/ton $25-90/ton NA $.02-.035/lb $.01/lb* $.03-$.15/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.34-$.50/lb
June 2009 $25-55/ton $10-45/ton $30-70/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $.005/lb* $.03-$.15/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.32-$.44/lb
May 2009 $10-45/ton $10-35/ton $30-60/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $.005/lb* $.03-$.15/lb $.01-$.09/lb $.32-$.44/lb
April 2009 $10-45/ton $10-35/ton $30-65/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $.005/lb* $.03-$.12/lb $.01-$.06/lb $.28-$.37/lb
March 2009 $10-50/ton $5-35/ton $30-70/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $.005/lb* $.03-$.10/lb $.01-$.05/lb $.18-$.37/lb
Feb 2009 $5-40/ton $5-30/ton $30-70/ton NA $.01-.035/lb $0 $.03-$.10/lb $.01-$.05/lb $.30-$.36/lb
Jan 2009 $5-35/ton $5-40/ton $30-70/ton NA $.01-.04/lb $0 $.03-$.04/lb $.01-$.03/lb $.30-$.40/lb
Dec 2008 $5-45/ton $5-40/ton $30-80/ton NA $.01-.04/lb $0 $.02-$.04/lb $.01-$.03/lb $.18-$.32/lb
Nov 2008 $20-60/ton $5-50/ton $40-105/ton NA $.04-.09/lb $.005/lb $.02-$.04/lb $.01-$.03/lb $.18-$.22/lb
Oct 2008 $55-90/ton $35-80/ton $45-155/ton $5-10/ton $.05-.10/lb $.03-.10/lb $.03-$.06/lb $.03-$.06/lb $.48-$.60/lb
Sept 2008 $65-105/ton $45-95/ton $45-165/ton $5-50/ton $.05-.10/lb $.03-.10/lb $.03-$.06/lb $.03-$.06/lb $.48-$.75/lb

 

* Only accepting 100 pounds plus of PET #1

 

Please note that this is a sample of what is being offered in New Mexico for certain commodities. Purchase prices for OCC and Paper are subject to change based on market fluctuations as reflected in the Southwest Region of the Official Board Markets’ Yellow Sheet. Prices vary according to presentation and quantity. These prices are for partial loads. Full truckloads of any of the materials would be paid at a greater price depending on the pick-up location and destination of the material.

 

Other resources:

http://www.amm.com/recman/recdata/reccomp.htm for national average commodity prices

http://www.wastenews.com/secondaryfiber/  

http://www.packaging-online.com/

 

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Recycling Scraps Sponsored By Dex

 

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Welcome to New Members 2011

Sean Gillespie, GreenPaso Services; Gordon West, Santa Clara Woodworks; Brian Gutierrez, Mr. G's Recycling; Joe McFarlin, EnviroEd, Inc; David Thomas, Rocking V Waterservices Corp; Jo Fanelli, Atlas Pumping Co., Inc.; Daniel Roemer, HaulRite of Four Corners, Inc; Betsy Windisch, McKinley Citizens Recycling Committee; Tara Chisum, Angel Fire Sustainability Committee; David Wentling, GrowRaton!; Connie Grove, Deming Public Schools; Michael Carpenter, Placitas Recycling Assoc.; Brian Gibson, Action Container Solutions; Sandy Blalock, NM Certified Automotive Recyclers Assoc & NM Metal Recyclers Assoc.

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Regional Round Up

Statewide - New Mexico Certified Automotive Recyclers Association is hosting a Recycling Summit and Training on August 20 in Albuquerque at Embassy Suites Hotel and Convention Center. For more information or to register, please contact Sandy Blalock at 505-228-0401 or 505-281-5418 or sandysblalock@gmail.com

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Grants, Loans and Jobs

State Loans

NMED Constructions Programs Bureau offers low-interest loans for solid waste projects: http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/cpb/rip.html

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Recycling Tidbits

Oregon Bottle Bill Signed
From Resource Recycling - Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber signed into law today the latest revision to the state's landmark bottle bill into law today, which expands the scope of containers covered by attaching a nickel deposit to all beverages, including beer, soft drinks, water, juice and sports drinks. More>>

EPA has Plan for Joplin Tornado Waste
The U.S. EPA has established a special drop-off location for household hazardous waste, white goods and electronic equipment as the clean-up in Joplin, Mo., continues following the tornado that hit the community on May 22.   More»

Florida Company Unveils a Recycling Robot
Florida Robotics, makers of entertainment robots, recently completed construction on a solar-powered recycling robot.   More»

Europe Recycles 50% of Packaging
European Union member states now recycle around 50% of packaging waste, according to a new report from packaging association Europen.   More»

UK Seeks to Boost Recycling with New Waste Plan
From Resource Recycling - The British Government has unveiled the results of its comprehensive review of waste, which will establish policies governing how rubbish is managed in the UK that could affect what's allowed in landfills and collection programs by local authorities. More>>

The Results are In: No Plastic Coated Paper in Compost
A new study by Eco-Cycle notes that plastic coated paper produces plastic fragments that do not biodegrade in compost More>>

NRC to Hold Major Fundraising Event
From Resource Recycling - The National Recycling Coalition will hold a major fundraising gala in Washington, D.C. on July 27. The mid-summer reception and dinner, which will honor a key Congressional leader, is one of the primary elements in NRC's financial growth plan. More>>

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Calendar

The NMRC board meets 5 times a year and members are always welcome to attend the meetings. We welcome your input and are always looking for new board members for our September election. We have also started offering a call-in option to board meetings. If you wish to attend any of the meetings, please RSVP ahead of time to english@recyclenewmexico.com.

  • September 14, 9 AM - 1 PM: NMRC Board Meeting, Moriarty.

  • November 3-4, 11:30 AM start on the 3rd, ending 1 PM on the 4th: NMRC Board Retreat, Sevilleta.

All these meetings are posted online at www.recyclenewmexico.com/calendar.htm

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2011 Recycling and Composting Facility Operator Certification

 

Certification Course

Date

Location

Compost Facility Operator

April 12-14

Ruidoso

October 4-6

Albuquerque

Recycling Facility Operator'

May 17-19

Ruidoso

Dec 6-8

Santa Fe

 

Recycling Facility Operators Certification Courses

*December 6-8, Santa Fe register   Held at the Genoveva Chavez Community Center with a tour of the Buckman Road Recycling and Transfer Station

 

Compost Facility Operators Certification Courses

*October 4-6, Albuquerque register  

Held at the Fire Academy with a tour of Soilutions & the Soil Amendment Facility.

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If you have questions about any of the above information or have articles for future Recycling Scraps, please e-mail or call

English Bird, Executive Director

New Mexico Recycling Coalition

PO Box 24364, Santa Fe, NM 87502

english@recyclenewmexico.com

(505) 983-4470 

 

 

 
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